voting

Potential Spike In Young Voter Turnout, Poll Shows

Apr 12, 2018
A new national poll shows a potential spike in young people voting in this year’s midterm elections. (Daniel Morrison/Flickr)
Brandon Smith

A new national poll shows a potential spike in young people voting in this year’s midterm elections.

Thirty-seven percent of people under the age of 30 say they will definitely vote in November’s election. That’s up from 23 percent who said the same in 2014, the last midterm cycle.

A Senate committee approved legislation Monday to ensure every valid absentee vote is counted – even if the voter dies before Election Day.

That approval comes despite objections from Secretary of State Connie Lawson’s office.

Current law invalidates absentee ballots if the voter dies after casting it, but before it’s counted on Election Day.

Jessica Whittle Photography / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jessiewhittle/3003345413

PRESIDENT

Trump/Pence (R):  48.59%

Clinton/Kaine (D): 43.05%

Johnson/Weld (L): 6.33%

U.S. SENATE

Todd Young (R): 47.72%

Evan Bayh (D): 45.86%

Lucy Brenton (L): 6.36%

GOVERNOR

Eric Holcomb (R): 48.09%

John Gregg (D): 48.21%

Rex Bell (L): 3.66%

ATTORNEY GENERAL

Curtis T. Hill, Jr. (R): 58.06%

Lorenzo Arredondo (D): 41.94%

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

Glenda Ritz (D): 51.84%

Tipp Co Cuts Ties With Election Software Company

May 13, 2016
Nathan Gibbs / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nathangibbs/

Six months before the November general election, the Tippecanoe County Election Board is shopping for a new contractor to provide computer software needed to run the voting system.

The three-member board voted Friday to cancel the county’s contract with Robis Elections, based in Wheaton, Illinois.

K. Latham / https://www.flickr.com/photos/programwitch/

Hoosiers going to the polls next month will be able to take a photo of their ballot after a federal judge halted a new state law banning so-called “ballot selfies.” 

The state said its law banning people from taking pictures of their ballot – whether filled out or not – in the voting booth was to help prevent voter coercion and vote buying and selling.  But federal judge Sarah Evans Barker says the state didn’t show any evidence that those problems exist.