The Breakdown

JD Gray/WTIU

In Elkhart, Post-Recession RV Sales Boom Strains Workforce

North Central Indiana is hoping new state funds and collaborations will help attract workers and diversify local economies. That's especially challenging in Elkhart, known as the recreational vehicle capital of the world -- and the city with the nation's highest unemployment rate during the recession. Now, the RV industry is booming -- but that's created problems of its own.
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Christiana Care / https://www.flickr.com/photos/christianacare/

Indiana adolescents participate in Medicaid and children’s health programs at a significantly lower rate than their younger counterparts, according to data from the Urban Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Of 13-to-18 year olds in Indiana who can receive Medicaid coverage, 83 percent are actually enrolled. That’s compared with 89 and 88 percent of kids 0-5 and 6-12, respectively. That 5 percent gap is standard across the U.S., although the national participation rates are higher on average.

Courtesy Crawfordsville Mayor's Office

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton says a growing rift within county Republicans can begin to mend after Thursday’s announcement that Republican Party Chairman John Pickerill would step down.

“Removing him from the mix certainly helps the healing process,” Barton says.

The mayor had spoken for months about his concerns with an increasing split between more moderate Republicans in the county and Pickerill’s more conservative wing of the party.

Pickerill says he doesn’t see himself and Barton as the two wings of the conservative establishment in the county.

indianahci.org

The state is looking for small towns in need of some rebranding to apply for the Hometown Collaboration Initiative, now in its third year.

The program tries to help communities of fewer than 25,000 residents revitalize their economies.

 

In their first two years, Hometown Collaboration coaches helped train local leaders and plan new amenities in 10 small towns and counties.

Jim Bauer / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lens-cap/8860363988

For the first time in more than 60 years, the Indy 500 will be broadcast live on local television. 

Track officials decided to lift the longstanding local TV blackout, declaring a sellout of all tickets, including infield general admission tickets.  

They say it’s the first sellout in Indy 500 history. 

Mark Miles, the president and CEO of track management firm Hulman & Company says the announcement was made after analyzing aerials of the infield during previous races and estimating how many more people the facility could safely accommodate.

Brandon Smith

Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Gregg on Wednesday announced State Representative Christina Hale will join him on the ticket in the fall general election.

Christina Hale, of Indianapolis, has focused on addressing sexual assault issues during her two terms in the Indiana House.

Gregg says, if elected, the former Kiwanis International executive will be his right hand, helping run the day-to-day operations of state government. 

He says naming Hale as his running mate was a governing decision, not a political one, and that her gender wasn’t a factor.

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Community Voices

Moneyball And The Myth Of The Unpaid Collegiate Athlete

The circularity of many arguments against paying collegiate athletes is enough to make you dizzy. Round and round universities and the NCAA go with their “they shouldn’t be paid because they shouldn’t be paid” arguments.
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WBAA Public Affairs

City of Frankfort

Ask The Mayor: Frankfort's Chris McBarnes On How To Be Excited By Roadwork

We’ve talked a lot with Frankfort’s Chris McBarnes about road repaving here on Ask The Mayor. Usually, it’s a question about why SR28 is in such bad shape. But this week, a more positive tone – when the city’s bids come in lower than expected, more paving can be done, But how much more? Also on this week’s program, some talk about public safety. The city has had a hard time gaining accreditation from a group of police chiefs, in part because of poor evidence handling. We’ll ask what’s held...
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Arts & Culture

John Clare

The Cosmos, Theatrical Quintets, Public Radio, And More!

Michael Gilbertson is a composer in Iowa, and Tracy Jacobson is a bassoonist in Texas. They are both in West Lafayette to be featured this weekend with the Lafayette Symphony Orchestra. Michael and Tracy spoke to WBAA's Music Director John Clare about a variety of topics - from new work The Cosmos by Gilbertson for Jacobson's theatrical WindSync, to the importance of public radio. Michael and Tracy have known each other for years, and Jacobson even played a work by Gilbertson in high school!...
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News From NPR

Attention, New Englanders: You may see a seal pup on the beach this weekend, and you may be tempted to take a selfie with it. The National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration is asking that you please resist that urge.

Katie Couric and the creator of a documentary on guns are apologizing — to a point — for switching around footage to make it falsely appear that members of a Virginia gun rights organization could not summon an answer to a key question on background checks.

Out of more than 280 spellers, only 10 remain. They will tackle words tonight beginning at 8 ET with hopes of becoming the 2016 Scripps National Spelling Bee champion. You can watch on ESPN or follow the competition's twitter feed for updates.

Here are some highlights about this promising young group:

They range in age from 11 to 14 — six of them are 13.

It's the first time four of them have been in the event. Five have competed once before, and one has participated twice before.

Nineteen people have been rescued from a cave in south central Kentucky, officials say. Seventeen cavers and two police officers who tried to help them had been trapped by floodwaters in Hidden River Cave, WBKO reports.

On Thursday, Donald Trump reached the magic number — 1,237. That's the number of delegates needed to clinch the Republican nomination, and he got there after 29 unbound Republican delegates decided to support him at the convention.

NPR's Don Gonyea spoke to some of those delegates to ask what made them decide to support Trump.

Ben Koppelman, Republican Convention Delegate From North Dakota

On switching support from Cruz to Trump

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