vozach1234 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/126640961

A group of Purdue professors is getting ready to study whether grades have risen artificially in the last 30 years.

Agriculture professor Levon Esters and math professor Ralph Kaufmann, agree with President Mitch Daniels that the issue deserves consideration if Purdue wants to maintain a reputation for rigor.

“If you have a Purdue education, it means something. If you got an A here, it means something,” Kaufmann says. “It’s not like at other Universities where 40-percent of the grades are A’s, so it doesn’t mean that much.”

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Despite a successful test of Tippecanoe County’s voting equipment Thursday, the county Election Board is dealing with another issue concerning misprinted ballots.

Unlike in last year’s election, when nearly 100 voters were given ballots with the incorrect races on them, this year’s error concerns the names of the candidates.

More than a quarter of the names on the ballot either feature a misspelling or a name listed in a way different from how the candidate filed it.

Rachel Morello/Indiana Public Broadcasting

A pre-K advocacy group made up of Indiana businesses and philanthropic organizations asked a group of legislators on Wednesday to give more funding to pre-K scholarships for low-income families, and legislators pushed back.

The advocacy group, which includes representatives from United Way, Eli Lilly and PNC Bank, among others, testified before the interim study committee on fiscal policy.  The committee will have influence over what is included in the state budget when the General Assembly convenes in January.

Bloomington Symphony Orchestra

WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with Adam Bodony, Director of Orchestras, about the next Purdue Symphony and Philharmonic Orchestra performance, Saturday, October 1 at 8 pm at the Loeb Playhouse in Purdue's Stewart Center.

Find out more about the concert here.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

 

A new bill in Congress would fast-track new affordable housing development in East Chicago.

The bill, from U.S. Rep. Todd Young (R-Ind.), aims to help more than 300 families who have to move out of the city's West Calumet Housing Complex in the next couple of months.

Students Question Gov. Candidates In Race's First Debate

Sep 28, 2016
NYC Department of Education / http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

This week’s first gubernatorial debate, a town-hall-style event at Indianapolis’ Lawrence North High School featured questions not from a moderator, but from students, teachers and administrators.

Republican candidate Eric Holcomb, Democratic candidate John Gregg and Libertarian candidate Rex Bell faced questions on standardized testing, Indiana’s teacher shortage, youth job availability and higher education. They laid out similar policy positions on almost all issues.

21d923f1-e5cc-47ad-ac48-a9a801fbb386
Srinivasan Chandrasekar / Purdue University

Researchers at Purdue University have found a way to fix a long-standing issue in manufacturing, where cutting a piece of metal can make its edges splinter or break apart.

They hope their solution will reap big savings in fuel and production costs.

The problem is called a shear-band. It's a deformity that occurs when a cutting machine pushes through metal, scrunching up its edges at a microscopic level.

Alex E. Proimos / https://www.flickr.com/photos/proimos/

Indiana University Health Plans, which provides insurance to approximately 23,000 Hoosiers, is the latest company to announce it won’t be offering coverage through the Affordable Care Act exchange in 2017.

Earlier this year, United Healthcare announced it was exiting Indiana’s individual marketplace, and last month, Fort Wayne-based Physicians Health Plan of Northern Indiana followed suit.

sciondriver / https://www.flickr.com/photos/minidriver/14307500816/

A Michigan senator is introducing legislation that would let urban farmers access the traditional agricultural safety net.

Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) says urban farming tactics such as community gardens and rooftop, hoop house or vertical growing are letting more people get into the business.

She told reporters on a press call Monday that she wants to make sure these farmers are included in the 2018 Farm Bill -- an omnibus package of food and agricultural policy that was last reauthorized in 2014.

accozzaglia dot ca / https://www.flickr.com/photos/aged_accozzaglia/2705768470

 

Harvest season is beginning for corn and soybeans in Indiana.

The latest USDA numbers say 74 percent of Indiana corn is mature, and 15 percent has been harvested. That's a little better than average. Soybeans are slightly behind, with 9 percent harvested as of this week.

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Ask The Mayor: Crawfordsville's Todd Barton On Fighting Wal-Mart

What happens when a mayor takes on one of the nation’s largest employers over a few hundred yards of road? That’s the situation Todd Barton finds himself in with Wal-Mart in Crawfordsville. This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’ll inquire how he plans to resolve the situation without alienating one of his city’s most prominent investors. Also on this week’s program, some issues of money: the city wants to give its employees a 3-percent raise in the coming year, but that cash has to come from...
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Bloomington Symphony Orchestra

Purdue Orchestras 10/1 Preview

WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with Adam Bodony, Director of Orchestras, about the next Purdue Symphony and Philharmonic Orchestra performance, Saturday, October 1 at 8 pm at the Loeb Playhouse in Purdue's Stewart Center. Find out more about the concert here. Adam Bodony is Visiting Instructor at Purdue, the Director of Orchestras since 2015. He currently serves as Executive Artistic Director of the New World Youth Orchestras (NWYO) in Indiana. Based at the Hilbert Circle Theatre in...
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News From NPR

A California man pleaded guilty Thursday in a federal court to an elaborate kidnapping that law enforcement had initially branded a hoax.

In court documents, 39-year-old defendant Matthew Muller is identified as a former Marine who suffers from bipolar disorder. He is described as a Harvard-educated lawyer who was later disbarred.

During the presidential debate on Monday night, Hillary Clinton raised a 1973 federal lawsuit brought against Donald Trump and his company for alleged racial discrimination at Trump housing developments in New York.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a special travel advisory Tuesday for pregnant women — and those trying to get pregnant.

They should "consider postponing nonessential travel" to 11 countries, the agency says. These countries include Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Maldives, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, East Timor and Vietnam.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

One week after a House panel highlighted sexual harassment claims at Yosemite National Park and elsewhere in the National Park Service, the superintendent of Yosemite, Don Neubacher is stepping down, the agency says.

According to NPS regional spokesman Andrew Munoz, the agency "acted to move Don Neubacher from his role" leading the park to protect the integrity of its investigation into allegations of a hostile work environment at Yosemite.

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