This week's feature explores children's literature through the more insightful eyes of adulthood. Nostalgically thumbing through old favorites and through new releases, author Bruce Handy presents his top ten picks with backstories on the authors and their lives at the time of publishing. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

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This Sunday the Lafayette Master Chorale continues their 53rd season at First Baptist Church in Lafayette. WBAA's John Clare spoke with artistic director Michael Bennett about the concert A Prayer for Peace.

Learn more about the concerts here

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This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we reflect on 2017 with Lafayette’s Tony Roswarski.

His city has finished some major construction projects, is waiting on some others and is dealing with public comments about both, including that flooding along the newly redone Main Street has gotten worse, not better.

Also, we talk about the ongoing debate over affordable housing in the city. Roswarski and other official opposed one plan for more low-income housing on the city’s south side, but the project’s developer simply moved to another site that didn’t require rezoning.

Nick Palmer leads the Lafayette Symphony Orchestra in its annual "Holiday Pops" concert Saturday, December 16th at 7:30 at the Long Center for the Performing Arts in Lafayette. Greg Kostraba spoke with LSO Music Director Nick Palmer about the concert, which will feature actors from Civic Theater of Lafayette as well as WBAA's John Clare reading 'Twas the Night Before Christmas.

City of West Lafayette

The construction may be done for the season along West Lafayette’s State Street, but questions about road work are not.

This week, on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we chat with West Lafayette’s John Dennis about road construction going on in several places and whether it’s trampling both travel times and flower beds.

Also on this week’s program, the Tippecanoe County Commissioners have approved a one-year extension of the county’s syringe exchange program, which Mayor Dennis was for before he was against it.

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill says he’s not opposed to using CBD oil products to treat medical conditions, but with very specific conditions.

Speaking on a panel Wednesday, Hill noted it’s not his role to decide on the legality of those products.

Gov. Eric Holcomb announced Wednesday the creation of a parental leave policy for state employees.

The new policy, open to all parents, will allow them to take up to four weeks paid leave within six months of the birth or adoption of a child.

Holcomb says the move is aimed at supporting families and ensuring the health of employees’ children.

“This is going to be centered on doing all that we can to recruit and retain the best state employee workforce that any state can boast,” Holcomb says.

Immigration Roundtable: 'Find A Solution For DACA, Now'

Dec 12, 2017

Hoosier community groups and businesses have a message for Indiana’s congressional delegation: find a solution for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act or DACA. The program allows minors who came to the country illegally to get an education and receive work permits.

It expires March 6, 2018 and the Trump administration has tasked Congress with finding a permanent replacement. There are several pending bills in Congress, including the DREAM act, which would provide a path to citizenship for DACA recipients.

IU Researchers Discover Fragile X Syndrome Link

Dec 12, 2017

Indiana University scientists have identified a new link between a genetic disorder and one of its under-studied characteristics. The research focuses on the abnormal tissue growth of people with what’s called Fragile X Syndrome.

The syndrome is an inherited genetic disorder that is most known for causing intellectual disabilities. IU researcher Arthur Luhur has focused on the biological factors.

“Nobody really knows what happens to the tissues inside the organs with all the focus being on the neuronal problems,” says Luhur.

Indiana To Fight Another Food Production Law

Dec 12, 2017

Indiana is leading 13 states in a lawsuit against Massachusetts over new food regulations. The law requires eggs, pork and veal sold in the Bay State to come from animals raised with room to lie down and turn around without touching an enclosure— it’s the second such lawsuit involving Indiana that’s been filed in the last two weeks.

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill says the Massachusetts law— scheduled to go into effect in 2022— will cost farmers and raise consumer prices.

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Arts & Culture

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What's New: Conductors As Composers

Conductors lead orchestras and other musical groups during performances and recording sessions. Composers write and arrange original music. Music directors may spend a lot of time traveling to different performances. Composers can work in offices, recording studios, or their own homes. Employment of music directors and composers is projected to grow just 3 percent over the next ten years, slower than most occupations. Despite expected audience growth, competition for posts is very high. We’ll hear from conductors who compose including Esa Pekka Salonen, Robert Spano, and Stanislaw Skrowaczewski on this What’s New .

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WBAA Public Affairs

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Ask The Mayor: Crawfordsville's Todd Barton On Seeing Video Of A Movie Shooting

There aren’t that many movies staged and shot in Crawfordsville. And probably only a small subset of those involve replica firearms. So when a Crawfordsville police officer encountered what looked like a robbery earlier this week and fired a bullet at an actor carrying an air gun, people began to formulate questions.

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How To Stream WBAA From Windows 10

Make sure your PC chooses a different program than Windows Groove (like Windows Media Player)

News From NPR

Noodle In China Measures Just Under 2 Miles

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The sexual harassment scandals over the past couple of months are causing some workers to rethink some of their office behaviors. Is it still OK to compliment a colleague on the way he or she looks? What about a congratulatory hug? Acceptable, or too risky in this new environment?

Navigating those distinctions isn't always clear.

At a recent office meeting, Bela Gandhi received a compliment from a man who told her, "you look great." Moments later, the man paused, reconsidered his comment, then wondered aloud whether Gandhi found it inappropriately sexual.

The plots of dystopian novels can be amazing. A group of teens in Holland, Mich., tells me about some of their favorites:

In Delirium by Lauren Oliver, Love is considered a disease. Characters get a vaccine for it. In Marissa Meyer's Renegades, the collapse of society has left only a small group of humans with extraordinary abilities. They work to establish justice and peace in their new world.

A Senate election in Alabama. A Republican tax bill moving through Congress. Violent protests in the Middle East following U.S. recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

What could these widely disparate matters have in common, besides heavy news coverage? It turns out that they all have enabled President Trump to send a message to one distinct and crucial category of his supporters.

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