From the facilities that sanitize sewage to the pipes that deliver drinking water, Indiana needs billions of dollars in urgent water infrastructure repairs. Some of that infrastructure is more than a century old.

According to Sen. Ed Charbonneau (R-Valparaiso), Indiana was wooden pipes, lead pipes, pipes that have been in the ground for 140 years.

“The best of the best utilities are on a replacement cycle of something like 140 years,” he says.

Redistricting Reform Likely Dead This Session

3 hours ago


 

An effort to reform Indiana’s redistricting process is likely dead this session.

Despite overwhelming support from those who attended a House Elections Committee hearing, committee chair Rep. Milo Smith (R-Columbus) wouldn’t take a vote on the redistricting reform bill.

Gov. Eric Holcomb made his first visit as governor to East Chicago Friday to meet with residents and community leaders in the lead-contaminated community.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

Within a month of each other, two downtown Lafayette farm-to-table restaurants have announced they’re closing for good.

But experts and chefs alike warn against making too much of the coincidence.

Restauration, a downtown Lafayette restaurant that opened in 2015, was a dream years in the making for owner and chef Kirsten Serrano.  She and her husband, Paco, already had a steady business running La Scala on the courthouse square, but Kirsten wanted to try something new: A farm-to-tale concept that used only local, whole foods and could cater to people with food allergies.

http://www.wvys.org/

WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with the Wabash Valley Youth Symphony's Guest Director Todd Craven, trumpeter Eli Trout and Sam Craig, bass soloist in the next WVYS concert, Sunday evening at 7 at Jefferson High School.

Book Review: Lit Up

Feb 17, 2017

David Denby, acclaimed writer for The New Yorker, sat in classrooms for an entire academic year to see if literature was really dead with the Millennial youth. He read the books and poems that were assigned, and witnessed the students discuss each piece. What he discovered was that the passion for reading still can be ignited - with the help of great teachers and great literature. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb will visit East Chicago on Friday to discuss his disaster declaration for the city’s ongoing lead contamination crisis.

Meanwhile, lawyers for residents being displaced by the contamination say the order doesn’t properly address the biggest concerns.

City of Frankfort

Immigrants comprise a significant portion of Frankfort’s population – between a fifth and a quarter, according to the most recent census.

So on this “Day Without Immigrants,” is the city seeing an impact made by protests against the Donald Trump administration – and, by extension, against Mayor Chris McBarnes, who supported Trump in his election bid and said on WBAA that he thought his Latino constituents should vote for the real estate mogul?


House Approves Tax-Raising Road Funding Bill

Feb 16, 2017

 

The House approved comprehensive road funding legislation that raises fuel taxes and opens the door to tolling Indiana interstate highways.

House Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis) says the House GOP’s road funding plan follows a simple philosophy: the user pays.

“And those that use the asset more, pay more. Those who use the asset less, pay less,” Bosma says.

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Purdue University's Division of Music presents pianist Matt Bengtson this Sunday afternoon. The program will include a world premiere by Allen McCullough, and music by Ravel, Albeniz, and William Bolcom. Music Director John Clare spoke with Bengston about the concert.

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Bloomington Symphony Orchestra

New Leaders For Band And Chorale - UPDATE

Update 2/20/17: Adam Bodony will join the faculty as Assistant Professor of Bands beginning fall 2017. Bodony will serve as the director of the Philharmonic and Symphony Orchestras and oversee the department’s Applied Music program.

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Ask The Mayor: Lafayette's Tony Roswarski On Trade War Consequences

In his state of the city address this week, Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski touted reductions in many different categories of crime. But publicly available data created by the Lafayette Police Department doesn’t seem to jibe with the mayor’s announced statistics. This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we ask him to explain how his numbers are so different from the ones the public can see.

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News From NPR

Defense Secretary James Mattis arrived in Iraq Monday on an unannounced visit that seemed aimed to reassure Iraqi allies. He told reporters that, despite President Trump's earlier statements to the contrary, the U.S. does not plan to seize Iraqi oil.

"All of us in America have generally paid for our gas and oil all along and I'm sure that we will continue to do so in the future," Mattis said. "We're not in Iraq to seize anybody's oil."

First, Jesse Hale Moore sucks you in with the emotional intensity of his falsetto; next, you realize the strength of his subtle songwriting. The soulful Philadelphian's forthcoming debut album, Green End, represents a period of growth aided by a collaboration with fellow Philadelphian Dave Hartley of The War On Drugs and Nightlands.

Hear two of Moore's new songs and download the full segment in the player above.

An "atmospheric river" is a colorful term for a sinuous plume of moisture that travels up from the tropics — a single plume can carry more water than the Mississippi River at its mouth. But new research shows that atmospheric rivers are also among the most damaging weather systems around.

The atmospheric rivers that soaked California this winter did some good — they ended an epic drought in the state.

 

From the facilities that sanitize sewage to the pipes that deliver drinking water, Indiana needs billions of dollars in urgent water infrastructure repairs. Some of that infrastructure is more than a century old.

According to Sen. Ed Charbonneau (R-Valparaiso), Indiana was wooden pipes, lead pipes, pipes that have been in the ground for 140 years.

“The best of the best utilities are on a replacement cycle of something like 140 years,” he says.

Redistricting Reform Likely Dead This Session

3 hours ago


 

An effort to reform Indiana’s redistricting process is likely dead this session.

Despite overwhelming support from those who attended a House Elections Committee hearing, committee chair Rep. Milo Smith (R-Columbus) wouldn’t take a vote on the redistricting reform bill.

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