At this weekend's U.S. Conference of Mayors in Indianapolis, leaders from cities big and small are brainstorming ways to collaborate on economic growth, rather than competing.

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg says that approach is already catching on in Indiana.

Outside a session with the mayors of Boston and New York, Buttigieg said his city of 100,000 is just big enough to have all the problems of a major metro area:

 

Wikimedia Commons

A federal trade board has sided with the American steel industry this week, ruling that China harmed U.S. companies with unfair business practices.

But, U.S. steelmakers won't get the all-out ban on Chinese imports they requested.

The ruling is a victory for Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel, which asked the International Trade Commission to recommend a ban on Chinese steel earlier this year.

Brandon Smith

Hundreds of America’s mayors are in Indiana this weekend for the U.S. Conference of Mayors’ annual conference.

They’re calling for Congress and the presidential candidates to support the nation’s cities.

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake leads the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Kicking off the group’s annual meeting, she emphasized the importance of metropolitan hubs to the nation’s economy.

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A Purdue University economist says he doesn’t think Indiana will feel much of an impact after voters in the United Kingdom elected to leave the European Union.

Jerry Lynch is a former interim dean of Purdue’s Krannert School of Management and says the state and its businesses will have to take a wait-and-see approach.

“It’s not going to be dire," Lynch says. "It has the potential, depending on the kind of agreements that get negotiated, of slowing down world growth in the economy. And if world growth slows down, Indiana is affected by it, there’s no question at all.”

Lee Coursey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeco/

As if there aren’t enough orange construction barrels on Indiana roads, drivers should brace for more.

Repairing roads was the priority this year when state lawmakers voted to return local income tax dollars to cities, towns and counties across the state.

How The Cash Can Be Spent

Seventy-five percent of the money must be spent on roads.

Lawmakers allowed local governments to spend the remaining quarter of the money they’re getting back on a non-road project or to put it away for future use.

  Ebola may seem like a disease of the past, but the outbreak that struck much of Africa happened only a few years ago. Zika virus seems to be at the forefront today, but many parallels between the two diseases can be made in the way we treat, support, and remember those who are struck with them. Lafayette native Richard Mertens, a nurse, recalls his experiences in Ebola Safari when he traveled to Sierra Leone to care for Ebola-stricken patients. Accounts of patient interactions, compassion, and the hardship of the medical field are captured in his many anecdotal chapters.

Chris Morisse Vizza

The 1,500 residents of Brookston spent Thursday without power, due to strong winds that felled dozens of trees and damaged buildings.

Most everyone in town, and on the outskirts, mentioned the sound of the wind that arrived with a storm just after midnight Thursday morning.

“I’ve never seen the wind like that last night,” Ken Lucas says. “That was just unbelievable.”

The hum of generators replaced the wind, as residents, including Lucas emerged from their houses and saw the damage.

ECP / https://www.flickr.com/photos/shamanic-shift/

A Kentucky man is facing the rare charge of timber theft in Indiana, which could land him up to 10 months in prison.

Cheyenne Allen of Salyersville, Kentucky, is facing federal charges after being caught in an illegal timber scheme.

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources and the US Attorney’s Office worked together on the case, which is the first time someone has been charged for timber theft in Indiana.

David Shank / Shank Public Relations Counselors

A new report from the Indiana Chamber of Commerce shows school superintendents and principals have favorable views of school counselors.

But those same officials say they can’t always hire counselors when students need them.

School counselors help students improve their academics, address emotional needs and prepare for college and careers … but they aren’t always there.

IU, Purdue Applaud SCOTUS Affirmative Action Ruling

Jun 23, 2016
Owen Parrish / https://www.flickr.com/photos/oparrish/3601673876

Indiana universities applaud the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the University of Texas’ affirmative action policies. The 4-3 ruling maintains affirmative action policies already at Indiana colleges.  

At stake was whether the University of Texas could consider race as one of several factors for acceptance.

Abigail Fisher sued the university after being denied admission … claiming she was discriminated against because she’s white. She says other, less qualified students were admitted because of affirmative action.

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Ask The Mayor: Lafayette's Tony Roswarski On Preferential Parklets

Much has already been written about Lafayette revamping its downtown Main Street this year – a project aimed at beautification and at luring more business to the area. But this week on Ask The Mayor, we find out whether certain business owners are getting more bang for their buck than others are the new amenities are installed. Also on this week's show: Amtrak officials are in Lafayette today to talk about improvements to the Hoosier State line. We ask Mayor Roswarski which is more important...
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Arts & Culture

Andrew Gena

What's New 7/3 Preview

Starting Sunday, July 3, a new program debuts: What's New. Host John Clare will feature new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of What's New, and let us know what you think. Joan Tower, on our first episode, Colors, also shares about her solo viola work, Wild Purple. “Wild Purple, which is a kind of a viola joke...as you know – violas are the brunt of many jokes. I think of the viola as purple, and in fact I just wrote a viola concerto called Purple Rhapsody,...
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The Breakdown

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How Using Property Tax To Pay For Major Bridges Creates Winners And Losers

Hoosiers changed the way property taxes are calculated, says Tippecanoe County Auditor Bob Plantenga, when voters in 2009 overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment setting permanent limits on all property taxes. The total tax bill on residential property can’t exceed 1-percent of the home’s gross assessed value. Tax bills on rental units, Ag land and long-term care facilities can’t exceed 2-percent of the value. The limit for business and industry is 3-percent.
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News From NPR

They were hoping to conquer their fears by walking over a bed of hot coals. But instead, dozens of people participating in a Dallas event hosted by motivational speaker Tony Robbins were treated for burns.

As a result of walking across coals, "a large number of these people sustained burn injuries to their feet and lower extremities," Jason Evans, a spokesman for the Dallas Fire-Rescue Department, said in a statement. Approximately 30-40 people were injured. Most elected to be treated at the scene, and five opted to go to a local hospital for evaluation.

Episode 707: Brexit

7 minutes ago

Note: This episode contains explicit language.

We woke up this morning to news that the United Kingdom had voted to leave the European Union. The tabloid newspapers in London proclaimed Independence Day. The value of the British Pound dropped to the lowest point in the last 31 years.

Stock markets dived around the world. Prime Minister David Cameron said he would resign later this year.

Today on the show: What just happened? And what's coming next?

The Brazilian laboratory that was designated to conduct drug testing for the Summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro has been suspended by the World Anti-Doping Agency for not conforming to international standards.

News of the suspension came in a statement issued in Montreal. The decision can be appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport within 21 days.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After 140 years in operation, the Buenos Aires Zoo in Argentina's capital plans to move almost all of its 2,500 animals to natural reserves.

Those animals too old or infirm to make the move will stay, but will no longer be kept on public exhibit. The zoo will become an educational eco-park where animals rescued from the illegal-trafficking trade may be helped and housed.

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