Indiana tax revenues fell further behind expectations as the state finished the first quarter of its fiscal year.

The first two months of the fiscal year put the state more than $40 million below expectations. September made it more than twice as bad.

Total tax collections last month were more than $66 million less than projected, which puts the state $107 million off the mark for the fiscal year.

Sales, corporate, and individual income taxes all missed their targets in September. Corporate and sales taxes haven’t yet met expectations at any point this fiscal year.

A legislative study committee this week will wrap up its examination of the state’s confined animal feeding operations — barns that feed hundreds to thousands of animals, such as pigs, cows and chickens.

The hearings have drawn impassioned testimony from supporters and opponents alike. Many crop farmers say the extra income from CAFOs helps keep family farms alive. But opponents say CAFOs can pollute waterways and emit a debilitating odor.

Committee chair Sen. Sue Glick (R-LaGrange) says there is a place for large-scale animal agriculture in Indiana.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re talking about what’s going to happen when the dust clears from the coming months’ construction. Will we see a new, or just a slightly improved, Lafayette? When it comes to improving quality of life, how swiftly is the city prepared to act?

We ask Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski how the city balances cleaning up the streets while launching a string of projects this past year, meant to attract people to Lafayette. But once they’re here, how do you get them to stay?

Rob Crawley / flickr.com/photos/robcrawley/3114271990

The Indiana Public Retirement System is set to go before the U.S. Supreme Court next month, where justices will decide if it can sue a publicly-traded company for alleged securities fraud.

In June of 2011, Science Applications International Corporation – or SAIC – issued a statement to the market detailing how it was under a criminal investigation for a group of employees’ kickback scheme in New York City.

The Indiana public pension fund had bought stock in the company shortly beforehand, and claims that information should’ve been made public much earlier.

An overnight sensation when she upset Serena Williams to win Wimbledon in 2004, Maria Sharapova has experienced her fair share of highs - and lows. After serving a 15-month suspension for a drug violation, she has come back as a stronger competitor and is sharing her rags-to-riches story with her fans. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

A group of 12 contiguous U.S. states in the Midwest and South has the highest rate of adult tobacco use in the nation. If taken as a country, this group would rank among those with the highest smoking rates in the world.

According to a report released by Truth Initiative last week, Indiana is one of these twelve states, along with neighboring Ohio, Michigan, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Missouri.

Courtesy IU Communications

Purdue University and Indiana University’s Robert H. McKinney School of Law are partnering up to form an agricultural law program. Those tasked with designing it will have to adapt to a changing field of study.

Ag lawyer Amy Cornell has been appointed as the consultant for the venture, which would train budding lawyers in agricultural issues. She’ll oversee a committee that will determine the needs of the ag market, as well as students and employers.

Cornell says ag law is broad, but holds unique opportunities because of its depth.

State Studies Barriers To Treatment Instead Of Prison

Oct 11, 2017

An estimated half of all people in state prisons have a substance abuse disorder. A few years ago Indiana lawmakers passed a bill revising the state’s criminal code to place nonviolent drug offenders in treatment instead of prison.

A legislative study committee, tasked to examine treatment options, finds there are many barriers.

Indiana Council of Mental Health Centers CEO Matt Brooks says Indiana is making moves to address this as a health issue instead of a criminal one

Rep. Lloyd Arnold (R-Boonville) will leave his southern Indiana seat to become the new head of law enforcement at the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

Gov. Eric Holcomb announced the appointment Wednesday. Arnold replaces Danny East, who left DNR last month.

The Republican lawmaker previously served in the U.S. Army, the Indiana National Guard, and as a reserve sheriff’s deputy. He also worked for Toyota in Princeton and for the Orange County Economic Development Partnership.

State lawmakers Wednesday heard a lot of support and a few fears about the local impacts of short-term housing rentals through platforms such as Airbnb.

Commerce and Economic Development Study Committee members say they want any future regulations on the issue to protect property rights – for both hosts and their neighbors.

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Arts & Culture

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What's New: Classical Goes Pop

We’re featuring some covers and popular music with classical groups on this episode. While often associated with early rock and roll music, Jukeboxes and their popularity extends back much earlier, including swing, opera, and classical music ! We’ll hear popular selections from David Bowie, the Beatles , and talk with Jethro Tull flutist Ian Anderson on today’s What’s New .

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Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Ask The Mayor: Crawfordsville's Todd Barton On Seeing Video Of A Movie Shooting

There aren’t that many movies staged and shot in Crawfordsville. And probably only a small subset of those involve replica firearms. So when a Crawfordsville police officer encountered what looked like a robbery earlier this week and fired a bullet at an actor carrying an air gun, people began to formulate questions.

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How To Stream WBAA From Windows 10

Make sure your PC chooses a different program than Windows Groove (like Windows Media Player)

News From NPR

We take it for granted that nostalgia is an ordinary, harmless emotion. You won't get a referral for a psychologist because you've posted a childhood photo with the caption #ThrowbackThursday, or because you have a weak spot for Lucky Charms or Fruit Roll-Ups. But that's a relatively new way of thinking.

The scientist who coined the term "nostalgia" in 1688 thought of this emotion as a neurological illness caused by demons. Other scientists latched onto this conception of nostalgia as a disease. It took marketers, centuries later, to realize that nostalgia has benefits.

A 61-year-old truck driver has pleaded guilty to two counts of human smuggling leading to the deaths of 10 unauthorized immigrants in San Antonio earlier this year.

James Matthew Bradley Jr. pleaded guilty to one count of transporting aliens resulting in death and one count of conspiracy, according to a statement released by the U.S. attorney for the Western District of Texas. Bradley faces up to life in prison.

The University of Louisville has fired men's basketball coach Rick Pitino, ending his tenure with the team roughly three weeks after the program was implicated in a federal bribery and fraud investigation. The board of the school's athletic association voted unanimously during a closed-door meeting Monday to terminate his contract with "just cause."

In 1940, on the eve of the United States' entrance into World War II, then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Immigration and Naturalization Service wanted to promote tolerance toward immigrants.

At that time, radio was the most important medium in the U.S. More than 80 percent of American households had a radio, and people listened for three or four hours every day. So, to reach the American people, the agency made a radio show.

J Roddy Walston & The Business were last on World Cafe in 2013 with the album Essential Tremors. A lot has changed since then.

After living in Cleveland, Tennessee and Baltimore, J. Roddy has settled in Richmond, Va., where he found a thriving music community, built a recording studio, and became a father. All of which affected the band's new album, Destroyers Of The Soft Life.

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