veterans

State officials Friday announced a new program that connects veterans with job opportunities and housing. It’s also an effort from the state to fill tens of thousands of unfilled jobs.

The program is called Next Level Veterans – a source for career training and a homebuyer program tailor made for veterans. The state launched a website to act as its hub.

Gov. Eric Holcomb says he wants veterans to consider making Indiana home, as they transition back to civilian life.

Momentum Grows For CBD Oil Legalization

Jan 18, 2018

Legislative leaders say there’s growing momentum to legalize the controversial cannabidiol, or CBD, for all Hoosiers.

Supporters of proposed House legislation say the measure would kick start Indiana’s industrial hemp industry. The bill would conform state law with the 2014 federal farm bill, which legalized hemp product and any of its derivatives – which includes CBD.

Military veterans won’t have certain financial resources considered when applying for tuition aid under legislation advanced Tuesday.

Federal legislation that takes effect this week will restore GI Bill benefits to 7,000 veterans affected by the closure of ITT Tech. U.S. Rep. Luke Messer (R-Ind.), the provision’s author, met with some of those veterans in Greenfield Monday.

The law, the Forever GI Bill, allows veterans to seek benefits at any point in their lifetime and increases education funding. Messer’s provision restores benefits to veterans affected by ITT Tech and Corinthian College closures after August 1, 2015.

Veterans Turn To Yoga To Help Treat PTSD

Dec 16, 2016
Jill Sheridan/Indiana Public Broadcasting

An estimated 8 million people in the United States suffer from PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder.

In Indiana, as many as 50,000 Hoosier veterans could be dealing with it.

But a new program is exploring a novel treatment, yoga.

U.S. Navy veteran Larry Dodd has had multiple surgeries.  He deals with poor circulation; he’s a recovering alcoholic; and he and his wife are raising their two young grandchildren because his son is dealing with addiction.

But he’s found something that helps with his stress.

The American Legion Honor Guard opened Lafayette’s Veterans’ Day ceremony Friday morning with a rifle salute in Riehle Plaza downtown.

President of the Tippecanoe County Veterans’ Council Tim Hilton led the ceremony. Hilton says he hopes the Trump administration will expand the military back up to what he calls a healthy level.

Indiana lawmakers are exploring changes to the way money is dispersed from the state’s Military Family Relief Fund.

Debate in a study committee hearing Monday centered, in part, on whether some veterans can be “trusted” with the money.

The Military Family Relief Fund helps combat veterans and their immediate families who are struggling financially. The fund subsidizes food, housing, utility, transportation and medical bills.

Kathy Swendiman / https://www.flickr.com/photos/112092763@N04/

A bill penned by Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly would seek to address doctor shortages in military hospitals by training physician assistants to administer psychiatric treatment to servicemembers.

The bill is attached to the 800-page National Defense Authorization Act, an annual piece of legislation that outlines military funding and expenditures. The Senate Armed Services Committee approved the NDAA last week.

“What we’re trying to do is in effect guarantee that there’s more than enough there for everyone who wants to talk to somebody,” the democrat says.

Brandon Smith / IPBS

Gov. Mike Pence Tuesday signed more than a dozen bills he says will expand benefits and opportunities for Indiana’s military servicemembers and veterans. 

Former Indiana National Guard Adjutant General Martin Umbarger was one of more than two dozen people gathered around the governor as he signed 13 bills into law. 

Umbarger says he’s particularly pleased with one that expands the Military Family Relief Fund.  That program was originally created to help post-9/11 veterans pay food, housing, utility, transportation and medical bills.  

U.S. Army / https://www.flickr.com/photos/soldiersmediacenter/

Senate Republicans are proposing expanding the Military Family Relief Fund to include combat veterans who served before 9-11. 

The General Assembly created Indiana’s Military Family Relief Fund in 2006 to help post-9-11 combat veterans and their immediate families who are struggling financially. The fund subsidizes food, housing, utility, transportation and medical bills.  And this session, Columbia City Republican Senator Jim Banks wants to expand it to cover all veterans who’ve seen combat – which he says will particularly help Vietnam vets.

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