Tippecanoe County Election Board

Chris Morisse Vizza/WBAA News

With nearly 32,600 ballots cast by the early voting deadline on Monday, Tippecanoe County was about 4,300 votes short of the early voting record set in 2008.

In the final four hours of early voting between 8 a.m. and noon, several hundred voters endured a 2 ½ hour wait in a line that line stretched from the sidewalk outside the county office building, up several flights of stairs to the election office on the third floor.

Courtney Stephenson says she has to work on Election Day, so she decided to wait her turn on Monday.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Despite a successful test of Tippecanoe County’s voting equipment Thursday, the county Election Board is dealing with another issue concerning misprinted ballots.

Unlike in last year’s election, when nearly 100 voters were given ballots with the incorrect races on them, this year’s error concerns the names of the candidates.

More than a quarter of the names on the ballot either feature a misspelling or a name listed in a way different from how the candidate filed it.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

A scheduled test of Tippecanoe County’s new voter check-in equipment had to be postponed Monday when the company that supplies ballots failed to deliver a computer file in time.

The file, which gives audio of each candidate’s name and party affiliation, is used by voting machines to assist visually-impaired voters.

That prevented a public run-through of new technology the county has purchased from Votec – technology County Clerk Christa Coffey says she’s expecting the first delivery of this week.

Election Board Hopes New System Solves Polling Woes

Aug 11, 2016
Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA

Tippecanoe County officials are hoping a new check-in system will make Election Day less stressful for both voters and volunteers.

The last several election cycles have been plagued with problems related to the county’s check-in system, from long waits for voters to stressful situations for volunteers. For example, the e-pollbooks have had difficulty connecting with the county’s voter database, and last November, an issue with the system distributed the wrong ballot to nearly 100 people during early voting.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Indiana saw the highest voter turnout for municipal elections in recent memory during this month’s race, even though only 20.5 percent of all eligible voters made their way to the polls.

Because it was a municipal election, only about 60 percent of all registered people were eligible to vote -- about 2.7 million voters.

Angie Nussmeyer of the Indiana Election Division says in 2011, 15 percent al all eligible voters voted in municipal elections, and in 2007, only 14 voted. She says the number of contested mayoral races probably led to this year’s jump.

Chris Morisse Vizza / WBAA News

At a Friday meeting to certify votes from last week’s municipal elections in Tippecanoe County, a Democratic candidate for West Lafayette City Council alleged widespread problems with the voting process.

Third District Democrat Joelle Jones, who lost a three-way race in her district, doesn’t dispute her outcome, but says she’s more concerned about the process.

Tippecanoe County officials are contacting some West Lafayette voters who cast their ballots early, after a computer error gave them the wrong ballot.

Tippecanoe County Clerk Christa Coffey says 94 voters in Wabash Township, which contains West Lafayette, received ballots containing the wrong city council race, thanks to a software error in the computer voting system the county employs. Coffey says the error was pinpointed Sunday after multiple people kept insisting their ballot was incorrect, even though the registration indicated they were in the right district.

Tippecanoe County Republicans will send about 35 delegates to the state convention in June.

Just four-years ago the number attending was 40.

The county Election Board rejected nine of eleven would-be delegates after challenges were initiated about their validity.

Members found that some people didn’t meet proper criteria to represent the party.

Board Chairman Bob Reiling says the pair allowed on the ballot registered to represent the wrong district, which wasn’t their fault.