soybeans

Joshua Duffy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joshduffyphoto/7283981926

Indiana’s farmers are expected to produce significantly less corn this year while soybeans didn’t take as bad a hit after flooding that devastated parts of the state. 

Indiana corn crops are expected to decline by about 20-percent from last year, while soybeans are only down 9-percent.  That follows the second-wettest June and July in the state’s recorded history. 

Yet Purdue corn specialist Bob Nielsen says the expected output is a mixed bag across the state.

Underwater Crops Could Soak Indiana Farmers

Jul 14, 2015
Joshua Duffy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joshduffyphoto/7283981926

This summer is shaping up to be one of the wettest on record in Indiana.

And that means many farmers across the state are being flooded with problems.

A good portion of Indiana’s corn and soybeans have been heavily damaged by the rain – some fields destroyed. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Barbara Brosher explains how that could impact your next trip to the grocery store.

Value Of Indiana Crops Down Despite Higher Prices

Jun 30, 2015
spablab / https://www.flickr.com/photos/spablab/

An agricultural economist says potential low yields of corn and soybeans are driving crop prices up. But that’s not necessarily good news for farmers.

At the beginning of June, farmers predicted an above average yield of corn and soybeans for the year.

But, Mother Nature had her own plans.

Consistent rain has drowned fields, ruining some crops.

Purdue University Agricultural Economist Chris Hurt says that’s driving sale price of corn and soybeans up, but the overall value of the crop down.

Joshua Duffy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joshduffyphoto/7283981926

With the prospect of Tropical Depression Bill swinging up across Indiana this weekend, farmers and some homeowners are keeping a wary eye on the sky. Across the northern third of the state, ditches are full, some fields have standing water and a few riverside homes are being sandbagged.

Several rivers in northern Indiana are flooding or in danger of flooding – the Tippecanoe, the Iroquois, the Wabash and in Sumava Resorts in Newton County, the Kankakee, where some residents were filling sandbags Wednesday.

Drought returning to some IN counties

Sep 5, 2013

Some Indiana counties are experiencing drought conditions again.

The latest report from the U.S. Drought Monitor show Benton, Newton, Warren and Lake counties are classified as having moderate drought. Prior to this week those areas, and about half of the state, were considered abnormally dry.

The Indiana State Climate office warns that the central portion of the state could move into moderate drought next week without enough rain, or if it continues to lose water.

No relief in sight from dry weather

Jun 25, 2012

Most Indiana counties are experiencing some form of drought. The worst hit is the southwestern part of the state.

Joe Kelsay is the director of the Indiana Department of Agriculture. He says the dry weather is a reminder of the difficulties farmers have growing their crop.

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