Ron Alting

Sunday Alcohol Sales Signed Into Law

Mar 1, 2018
Samantha Horton / IPB News

In front of media, staffers and legislators, Gov. Eric Holcomb signed the bill into law. Holcomb says the bill is giving the consumers what they want.

“This is just yet another example where the State of Indiana has sought to, and indeed modernized, our laws to meet consumer expectation,” Holcomb says.

As expected, Hoosiers will be able to purchase alcohol on Sundays, starting this weekend.

“There is absolutely no need to any longer to make run for the border if you’re a Hoosier or a Hoosier at heart,” Holcomb says.

David Shankbone / Wikimedia Commons

A Senate panel voted Wednesday to get rid of proposed alcohol regulations that would have governed where alcohol is housed in stores and who’s legally allowed to ring it up.

Some advocates decry the elimination of what they call safeguards the same day the governor signed a bill expanding alcohol sales to Sundays.

The proposed bill would have required all cashiers conducting alcohol sales to be at least 21-years-old. But a Senate committee stripped out that provision.

Brandon Smith / IPB News

The stroke of a pen is all that separates Indiana from legal Sunday alcohol retail sales.

The state Senate voted one last time Thursday to send to the governor a measure eliminating a Sunday sales ban that’s stood since Prohibition.

Measures to undo the law failed for decades. But this year, two of the interest groups long at odds over the issue – grocery and liquor stores – made peace and backed the effort.

Indiana is one of just three states in the country without an official state insect. Legislation passed in the Senate Tuesday would change that.

The unanimously approved bill is the initiative of West Lafayette elementary school students. Their push to name the Say’s Firefly as Indiana’s state insect began three years ago.

Alcohol Tax Increase Unlikely In 2018 Session

Dec 21, 2017

Indiana’s alcohol excise tax hasn’t changed in 36 years. And the state’s Alcohol Code Revision Commission thinks it should, recommending a 25 percent increase.

But Senate Public Policy Committee Chair Ron Alting (R-Lafayette) says that won’t happen in 2018.

Lawmakers completed a temporary rewrite of the state’s alcohol carryout laws to address a convenience store that found a legal work-around.

Ricker’s acquired restaurant permits for two of its convenience stores. Those permits allow them to sell cold beer and hard liquor for carryout – which grocery and convenience stores have never been allowed to do.

City of Frankfort

Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes says he’ll consider running for Indiana’s 4th District congressional seat if incumbent Todd Rokita wins the Republican nod to replace Governor Mike Pence on the ballot.

McBarnes, who’s just a couple years older than the 25-year-old minimum to run for the U.S. House, says he’s discussed the possibility with his wife, but adds he’d have to decide whether he could make more change in Congress than he can in Clinton County.

Jim Nix / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimnix/5039079018

The Senate is expected to vote Tuesday on whether to add transgendered Hoosiers to a gay-rights bill.

Democrats and gay-rights groups have opposed Senate Republicans' civil rights bill because it pushes the question of transgender protections to a study committee.

The bill's supporters have argued more debate is needed about transgender rights.

But Sen. Ron Alting (R-Lafayette) has filed an amendment to add gender identity to the bill.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Only 31-percent of registered voters in Tippecanoe County actually voted in last year’s general election. That anemic turnout was still double what the primary election registered. Both elections were in keeping with similar trends at the state level.

The Greater Lafayette League of Women Voters, the Hanna Community Center and the group Citizens for Civil Rights are trying to address those worrying statistics by pondering an age-old problem: how to get young and minority voters more invested in politics.

Powdered Alcohol Ban Expedited

Mar 16, 2015
Indiana Senate Republicans / http://www.indianasenaterepublicans.com/

Indiana lawmakers are rushing to ban powdered alcohol before it reaches store shelves in the state. The bill’s author fears the substance could endanger young adults.  

When mixed with any liquid, a package of the powdered alcohol creates an instant cocktail with the same alcoholic content as a shot. Indiana lawmakers were already in the process of banning the substance when it received approval last week from federal authorities. Lafayette Republican Senator Ron Alting authored the bill. He plans to amend the legislation so it takes effect right away.

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