Purdue University

21d923f1-e5cc-47ad-ac48-a9a801fbb386
Srinivasan Chandrasekar / Purdue University

Researchers at Purdue University have found a way to fix a long-standing issue in manufacturing, where cutting a piece of metal can make its edges splinter or break apart.

They hope their solution will reap big savings in fuel and production costs.

The problem is called a shear-band. It's a deformity that occurs when a cutting machine pushes through metal, scrunching up its edges at a microscopic level.

tanakawho / https://www.flickr.com/photos/28481088@N00/

Researchers from Purdue and other universities published a major global analysis of invasive species threats. The study found invasive species will primarily endanger developing countries.

Jeff Dukes, a Purdue University biology and forestry professor, calls invasive species plants or animals that have invaded an area they’re not native to.

Purdue University News / https://twitter.com/PurdueUnivNews

Purdue University made national headlines this spring when the school’s researchers were the first to map the entire molecular structure of the Zika Virus. But National Institutes of Health leaders visited campus Thursday to say such triumphs may come less frequently unless Congress acts soon to secure funding.

March’s Zika breakthrough came with the help of money from grants funded by the NIH, the agency responsible for federal biomedical and health-related research.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Purdue University cut the ribbon Monday on a $15 million plant research center that's the first of its kind in North America.

Researchers at the new Indiana Corn and Soybean Innovation Center will study the growing habits of cash crops at the school's 1,400-acre research farm.

A new program airs Sunday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


Courtesy Purdue University

A major new plant science lab at Purdue University has gotten funding approval from the state.

Researchers at the $6.25 million Controlled Environment Phenotyping Facility will study how to make cash crops grow better in a high-tech setting.

Purdue already has a lab that studies the traits of plants -- from their visible parts down to their DNA.

But that lab is outside, at the school's research field -- which is what will set the new facility apart, according to phenomics director April Agee Carroll.

City of West Lafayette

Now that West Lafayette has hired a contractor to demolish the old city hall on Navajo Drive, what's next for the site, and why did it take two years to do something with the mold-contaminated building?

What does Mayor John Dennis want from the city's new Development Director, Erik Carlson? Dennis says Carlson is a "take charge kind of guy" who can recruit businesses to the city of roof tops and tree tops, not smokestacks.

The mayor explains why he's an ardent supporter of putting micro chips in pets.

Bob Nielsen / Purdue University

They say that Indiana corn should be knee-high by the fourth of July.

With changes in how we farm, that isn't really true these days -- but agronomists do say the crop is on track for a strong 2016 harvest.

The self-titled "corn guy" of Purdue University, Bob Nielsen, says the Cass County cornfield where he was scouting a few days before the holiday looked green and healthy -- though:

"It's not knee-high by the fourth of July -- it's head-high," he says.

IU, Purdue Applaud SCOTUS Affirmative Action Ruling

Jun 23, 2016
Owen Parrish / https://www.flickr.com/photos/oparrish/3601673876

Indiana universities applaud the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the University of Texas’ affirmative action policies. The 4-3 ruling maintains affirmative action policies already at Indiana colleges.  

At stake was whether the University of Texas could consider race as one of several factors for acceptance.

Abigail Fisher sued the university after being denied admission … claiming she was discriminated against because she’s white. She says other, less qualified students were admitted because of affirmative action.

Purdue Muslim Student Association Decries Orlando Attack

Jun 13, 2016
Chris Morisse Vizza / WBAA

The Purdue Muslim Student Association released a statement about the Orlando, Florida mass shooting at a gay night club where a gunman killed at least 49 people.

The release states:

“The Purdue University Muslim Student Association offers our deepest condolences for the victims of the tragedy in Orland. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims’ families during this difficult time.

Pages