Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky

President Trump nominated Judge Brett Kavanaugh to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy on the U.S. Supreme Court. (Wikipedia Commons)
Brandon Smith

President Donald Trump’s nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court has many eyes turning to Indiana –  incumbent Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) is a key vote in the Senate.

Donnelly’s statement says only that he’ll carefully review Kavanaugh’s record and qualifications. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) is more direct – he praises Kavanaugh as an “originalist.”

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Araceli Gomez-Aldana / WBOI

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky will be closing its Fort Wayne health center.

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky and the ACLU of Indiana are cheering a recent decision halting a provision of a new Indiana abortion law from taking effect Sunday. A federal judge halted the law, saying it was likely too vague to enforce.

Counties Want Out Of New Indiana Abortion Lawsuit

May 2, 2018
Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky CEO Christie Gillespie (left) and ACLU of Indiana Legal Director Ken Falk discuss a recent victory in an abortion lawsuit. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Three Indiana county prosecutors don’t want to defend the state’s new anti-abortion law against a suit brought by Planned Parenthood.

A lawsuit challenging Indiana's 2018 anti-abortion law marks the sixth suit Planned Parenthood has brought in federal court against the state since 2011. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Planned Parenthood and the ACLU want a federal judge to strike down parts of Indiana’s new anti-abortion law.

The lawsuit challenges the 2018 law’s new abortion complication reporting requirements and mandated yearly inspections of abortion clinics. Under previous law, such inspections were optional.

An anti-abortion group is criticizing a decline in Planned Parenthood’s services and clients over the last decade. The attack comes as the number of abortions increased slightly.

The number of patients at Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is down about 50 percent since 2007. The organization went from 35 clinics to 17 in that time.

Indiana Right to Life president Mike Fichter says that’s proof the organization is failing.

Planned Parenthood in Indiana and Kentucky named Christie Gillespie as their new president and CEO Tuesday.

Gillespie has worked for 25 years in nonprofit leadership roles, most recently with the United Way.

Her predecessor, Betty Cockrum, will retire at the end of June, after leading Planned Parenthood for 16 years.

READ MORE: Retiring Planned Parenthood CEO Says Biggest Threat Still From The State

Many supporters of Planned Parenthood rallied Friday in response to the U.S. House of Representatives passing the American Health Care Act (AHCA). Some Hoosiers say it will decrease general healthcare access for low-income residents.

An event outside of U.S. Rep. Susan Brooks office in Carmel was one of many held across the nation. A few dozen supporters crowded the halls outside her office and police were called at the request of a building manager who was worried about a fire hazard.

Raychel Mendez / https://www.flickr.com/photos/raychelnbits/

A law signed last week by President Donald Trump allows states the ability to block federal funding for organizations that provide abortion services, such as Planned Parenthood.

However, thanks to a state law that prohibits state funding of abortion providers, public health leaders say so-called Title X funding in Indiana is largely safe from any state legislative attacks.

Women in Indiana no longer have to wait at least 18 hours between an ultrasound and an abortion after a recent court ruling halting part of last year’s controversial abortion law.

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