opioids

The FDA has approved a device developed in Indiana that helps reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms. The NSS-2 BRIDGE is a nerve-stimulating device placed behind the ear which sends electrical pulses to the brain.

It’s been shown to reduce severe effects of opioid withdrawal, such as nausea and vomiting. Sen. Jim Merritt (R-Indianapolis) says the technology fills a gap in treatment.

Foster Families Needed For Children In Indiana

Nov 1, 2017

The need for adoptive parents is growing in Indiana. The link between cases coming through the Department of Child Services and substance abuse disorders is direct.

So far this year DCS has completed more than 1,800 adoptions, up from a little more than 1,000 three years ago. This follows a sharp increase in the number of Hoosier children entering the foster system because parents are unable to care for them, often because of opioids.

Indiana DCS Director Mary Beth Bonaventura says awareness of the need for foster to adopt families is imperative.

A shortages of qualified treatment providers is frequently cited as an obstacle in fighting the opioid addiction crisis. Yet, according to research published in the journal PLoS One, the solution may lie in the hands of primary care providers who can successfully treat addiction.

Indianapolis, Indiana.
Evan Walsh

On a rainy day in Austin, Indiana, Brittany Combs, the public health nurse for Scott County, drives around in a white SUV. Medical supplies are piled high in the back of the vehicle: syringes and condoms, containers for used needles, over-the-counter medications.

Indiana will receive more than $3.5 million in federal funds to tackle the opioid epidemic. The money going to 21 health centers, will primarily be used to increase behavioral health services.

The Health Resources and Services Administration, or HRSA, will disperse more than $200 million in grants to qualifying health centers around the country that serve patients regardless of ability to pay.

Indianapolis’s Raphel Health Center CEO Dee Roudebush says the funding comes just in time.

INSPECT Integration Aims To Better Track Opiates

Aug 24, 2017

Gov. Eric Holcomb announced an effort to rein in the number of opioid prescriptions given out in the state. Indiana is the eighth highest prescribing state in the country.

The new initiative will integrate the state’s online prescription tracking program with health care systems across Indiana.

Indiana Sen. Erin Houchin (R-Salem) says the improvement can aid in prevention.

“We have to stop the problem at its source really, to stop addicts before they become addicts,” Houchin says.

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Wikimedia Commons

One of the first Indiana counties to implement a syringe exchange is now the first in the state to effectively shut its program down.

J J / flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4172577749

The Lafayette Police Department is asking residents to bring unwanted drugs and needles to them, instead of flushing them down the toilet or giving them away.

The LPD is hosting a ‘drug takeback’ event this weekend in an effort to keep substances like unused opioids off the streets and out of the water – but it’s not primarily addressed at the types of drugs Lafayette is having the most trouble policing, such as heroin.

Sgt. Matt Gard says even if a person brings illicit drugs or a prescription that isn’t theirs, they should feel safe to let the police dispose of it.

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Sarah Fentem

A new study shows some people are still afraid to call 911 when helping an overdose victim, despite an Indiana law that permits friends and bystanders to administer the overdose antidote naloxone.

More than a quarter of people surveyed by two researchers at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis said they didn’t call 911 at the scene of an overdose for fear of arrest.

Eli Lilly is partnering with Pfizer to help develop a new drug that could be the first of a new class of non-opioid pain medications.

There hasn’t been a new pain medication discovery in about 50 years. The last new non-opioid pain medication to hit the market was ibuprofen in the late 1960s.

That’s a problem, because Indiana University Health’s Daniel Rusyniak says when it comes to the treatment of chronic pain we need more options.

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