millennials

 

Environmentalists around the state are gearing up for the 2017 legislative session, and some will make the case that greater environmental protection is crucial for economic development.

Jesse Kharbanda, executive director of the Hoosier Environmental Council, says one priority is to get increased funding for the Indiana Department of Environmental Management. Since 2007, state funding for IDEM has been cut by 25 percent. Kharbanda says that means less money for the agency to enforce regulations, monitor pollution or hire personnel.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

While he’s not endorsing anyone in this year’s elections, Purdue President Mitch Daniels came very close to aligning himself with Libertarian Gary Johnson at an event on campus earlier this month.

Johnson, like Daniels, wants to reduce the national debt – the very subject Daniels was summoned to chat with Congress about a couple weeks ago – a conversation he says was meant as a rebuke of the House and Senate, both of which are led by fellow Republicans.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Indiana will begin registering businesses as “benefit corporations,” which gives companies the flexibility to be socially conscious while still making money. The new designation is meant to bridge the gap between for-profit and non-profit companies.

Secretary of State Connie Lawson says the benefit corporation designation protects companies against shareholder lawsuits when profits aren’t maximized at the expense of a social mission.  She notes it’s a popular concept with millennials, a group she says will make up 75 percent of the workforce in the next decade.

Claire McInerny / StateImpact Indiana

The way to a meaningful college education is becoming increasingly complicated. The nation’s job force is demanding a college degree at the same time it’s becoming more and more expensive to get one.

Tuition is increasing and grants and financial assistance aren’t keeping pace. Young people are taking out thousands of dollars to get just a bachelor’s degree.

Re-entering The Workforce Series: Part 2 -- Students

Aug 12, 2015
Gretchen Frazee / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The workplace is changing at a rapid pace -- employees have to learn how to use new technology every day, jobs can often be more short-term and project-oriented, and companies are looking for people who not only have the skills to fill today’s positions but are able to think ahead and shape how business is done in the future.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Only 31-percent of registered voters in Tippecanoe County actually voted in last year’s general election. That anemic turnout was still double what the primary election registered. Both elections were in keeping with similar trends at the state level.

The Greater Lafayette League of Women Voters, the Hanna Community Center and the group Citizens for Civil Rights are trying to address those worrying statistics by pondering an age-old problem: how to get young and minority voters more invested in politics.