Mike Pence

Indiana Department of Administration

During the first quarter of this year, Democratic governor candidate John Gregg raised more money than incumbent Republican Mike Pence. 

Without last minute support from a national group, Pence would’ve been out-raised nearly two-to-one.

Gregg brought in more than $1.8 million between January and March.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

State and local road funding, harsher penalties for drug dealers, and holding schools harmless for a drop in ISTEP scores – those are some of the initiatives Governor Mike Pence says will be part of his legislative agenda for the upcoming session.  

Pence unveiled his $1 billion state road funding plan months ago, a proposal that spends down the state’s budget reserves and incorporates bonding. He signed on last month to a Senate Republican local road funding bill worth more than $400 million.  

Lawmakers To Debate Length Of Road Funding Plan

Jan 4, 2016
Brian Hefele / https://www.flickr.com/photos/brhefele/6973020335

The looming legislative debate over road funding will involve not just how to pay for it, but whether to seek a short-term or long-term solution.

Governor Pence has proposed $1 billion in road funding over four years.

But House Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis) has called for a long-term funding fix.

House Republicans have proposed a hike in the gas tax to make up for 13 years of inflation since the last increase.

Pence Announces New State Mental Health Hospital

Dec 16, 2015
courtesy photo

Governor Mike Pence announced Wednesday plans for a new $120 million mental health hospital on the east side of Indianapolis. 

The state is partnering with Community Health Network to develop a neuro-diagnostic institute, which will have 159 beds and the capacity to treat 1,500 patients per year.

Pence emphasizes that along with confronting mental illness, the facility was created to fight the state’s ongoing drug addiction crisis.

Pence also notes that of the 30 thousand people incarcerated in Indiana, nearly half have a mental illness or substance abuse disorder.

Office of the Governor

Governor Mike Pence Tuesday reiterated the defense of his decision to suspend Indiana’s refugee resettlement program for those fleeing Syria and, now, Iraq.  But three weeks after he announced the suspension, it’s still unclear how much impact Pence’s policy can have.

Pence’s comments came in the wake of Indianapolis Archbishop Joseph Tobin’s announcement that Catholic Charities brought in a Syrian family to the Hoosier State.  The governor says he respectfully disagrees with that decision while adding that his heart goes out to the refugees.

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