manufacturing

David Wilson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidwilson1949/12783674125

Steelmaker ArcelorMittal, whose largest North American mill is at Indiana Harbor in East Chicago, is introducing a new high-strength steel for cars.

It's part of an effort to boost profits at the world's largest steel producer by volume -- amid an uncertain time for the industry.

The new steel is designed for the interior rails and pillars that make cars safer during a crash.

A spokesperson from Arcelor says it should make cars lighter and cheaper to produce when it's rolled out next year.  

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Indiana is seeing a boom in manufacturing job creation – outpacing most of the country. And even more jobs will open up as baby boomers retire.

Many businesses are working harder to fill those jobs with military veterans, like 57-year-old Tim Turner.

Right now, he shares a house on a quiet street northwest of downtown Indianapolis with two other formerly homeless veterans.

Annie Ropeik

 

Subaru is ahead of schedule on hiring 1,200 new workers at its only factory in the U.S., in Lafayette.

A thousand new employees are already at work at Subaru of Indiana Automotive (SIA), gearing up to start making new Outback and Impreza models later this year.

Indiana Sen. Dan Coats (R) visited the plant on Thursday and praised the hire:

"It's a lot more fun if you're an elected representative to go to a building where they're adding people rather than subtracting them," he said.

 

J.D. Gray

President Barack Obama is shining a spotlight on Elkhart, Indiana – the first city he visited as president – calling it a symbol of America’s economic recovery.

Obama returned Wednesday with a message defends his legacy while laying the groundwork for a Democratic victory this fall.

When the president visited in 2009, unemployment was nearly 20 percent in the community that heavily relies on manufacturing and the recreational vehicle industry,

Seven years later, that rate is now below four percent. 

Donnelly Proposes Penalties For Companies That Outsource Jobs

May 20, 2016
Annie Ropeik

Indiana Senator Joe Donnelly is introducing policies that he says will deter American companies from outsourcing jobs to foreign countries. 

The recommendations come as Indiana-headquartered Carrier Corp. and United Technologies Electronic Controls are moving more than 2,000 jobs from Indiana to Mexico.

Donnelly hasn’t written a bill to dissuade companies from moving jobs overseas. 

Instead, he’s written policy recommendations that he sent to the Senate Finance Committee.  He says it’s faster.

JD Gray/WTIU

North Central Indiana is hoping new state funds and collaborations will help attract workers and diversify local economies.

That's especially challenging in Elkhart, known as the recreational vehicle capital of the world -- and the city with the nation's highest unemployment rate during the recession.

Now, the RV industry is booming -- but that's created problems of its own.

M Sullivan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelsullivan/406152

The final changes to federal overtime pay law are out this week.

Businesses in Indiana and nationwide now have until December to figure out which of their workers can start earning OT -- and how to pay for it.

 

Under the final version of the rules, salaried employees making less than $47,476 a year will earn time and a half for working overtime.

It's twice the old threshold -- and it could cost the most for Indiana trades like retail, manufacturing and education, says Indianapolis-based compensation consultant Julie Bingham.

Vincennes University

 

Vincennes University is teaming up with Indiana manufacturers to recruit more women into tech and engineering jobs.

 

The public school will sponsor 46 women to live in a dedicated dorm while pursuing two-year science, technology, engineering or math degrees next fall.

 

Paul Lowry / https://www.flickr.com/photos/paul_lowry/

For the most part, people in Indiana are reaping the benefits of record-low oil prices at the gas pump without having to deal with the fallout. But when it comes to economics, a true win-win situation is rare.

In Indiana, the companies hit hardest by low oil prices are the same ones as in Texas or Louisiana—the producers who get the oil out of the ground and sell it to refineries. CountryMark CEO Charlie Smith says the number of wells being dug in Indiana has plummeted.

Flazingo Photos / https://www.flickr.com/photos/124247024@N07/

Indiana’s unemployment rate declined for the eighth consecutive month in October, hitting a 14-year low in the Hoosier State. 

The Indiana unemployment rate fell to 4.4 percent last month, the lowest level since August of 2001. 

The state’s private sector added jobs for the seventh time out of nine months in 2015 – though October’s additions were modest, merely 100 jobs. 

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