John Adams

josephrackers.com

Tickling the ivories – what a wonderful phrase to describe playing the piano! We’re amazed about how many keyboard artists are on the rise, and how many recordings are around of the great masters.

We’ll hear from piano players young and old, and music from Bach to Adams on today’s What’s New.

What's New: John Adams

Jan 17, 2018
Lambert Orkis

About sixty miles and a few hundred years separate John Adams, president, and John Adams, composer. We’ll focus on John Coolidge Adams, Pulitzer Prize winning composer from Worcester, Massachusetts. During the 2016/2017 season, Adams served as their composer in residence for the Berlin Philharmonic. The orchestra performed well-known works and new discoveries – which are now available in an exclusive edition on CD and Blu-ray.

christinaandmichellenaughton.com

Christina and Michelle Naughton have been hailed by the San Francisco Examiner for their “stellar musicianship, technical mastery, and awe-inspiring artistry”. The sisters perform Friday evening in Loeb Playhouse for Purdue Convocations. WBAA's John Clare spoke to them about the concert, about recording, and social media.

Find out more about the concert here. There is a 7pm pre-concert talk by WBAA's John Clare in Stewart 206 that is free and open to the public.

Ebay

There’s an old joke about the “definition” of a string quartet: a good violinist, a bad violinist, someone who used to play violin, and someone who hates violins! It’s a funny stereotype – but the string quartet has sparked the imagination of composers since Alessandro Scarlatti and was perfected by Joseph Haydn.


Casey Houtz

A new program airs Sunday and Tuesday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


What's New: 9/11 Music

Sep 9, 2016
alchetron.com

Conductor JoAnn Falletta shared: "Can anyone be the same after 9/11? Can I ever forget the images I saw on television...or later, the heartrending homemade altars of flowers and candles on the New York city streets we thought were invincible?

Most of all, I remember how important it was to be together that weekend at our concert, to sit in that darkened hall and draw comfort from Beethoven and from each other, to sing our National Anthem with a searing intensity we had never felt before, to believe that the part of man that could create such beauty as music was the part of us that would sustain and heal us and, somehow, make us whole again."

We’ll hear music inspired from events on September 11, as well as some of the composers on today’s What’s New!