Jennifer McCormick

Department of Education Outlines 2018 Priorities

Nov 28, 2017

State superintendent Jennifer McCormick released her priorities for 2018, and those strategies target three areas: student learning, operational effectiveness and school improvement. In this last category, she says she wants to make it easier for teachers licensed in one content area to teach an additional subject if they have the experience.

A state committee recommended sweeping changes to high school graduation requirements Tuesday even as many of the details remain unknown.

If approved by the State Board of Education students, starting with the class of 2023, would choose from multiple academic tracts to satisfy three graduation requirements that are designed to better prepare them for college or career.

A national nonprofit is partnering with Indiana to improve high-speed internet access for schools across Indiana during the next two years.

The focus will be on 30 schools that lack high-speed fiber connections. There will also be assistance for school districts to apply for federal grants to improve broadband infrastructure or increase classroom Wi-Fi access.

The organization EducationSuperHighway, a San Francisco-based nonprofit working to bring internet access to U.S. classrooms, will also help local schools negotiate lower rates with internet providers.

Results from the 2017 ISTEP exam remain nearly unchanged compared to last year after an overhaul of the standardized test caused pass rates to plummet two years ago.

Only about half of Hoosier students in grades three through eight passed both parts of the required math and English assessment. The state Department of Education released results today.

For the Spring 2017 test, 51.5 percent of students passed both parts. That’s a fraction of a percent less from the previous year.

State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick and two of her predecessors from both political parties will come together Saturday for a public forum on education.

The panel discussion Saturday in Indianapolis tackles a broad topic: “the future of Indiana public education in an era of privatization, declining budgets and increasing expectations”

State Superintendent Jennifer McCormick will be joined by Glenda Ritz and Suellen Reed.

Indiana’s proposed federal education plan has been published online and it is now in the hands of Gov. Eric Holcomb.

Indiana is required to submit a new federal education plan this year as part of the Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaced the No Child Left Behind law in 2015.

READ MORE: Indiana Plan Under the Every Student Succeeds Act

The plan includes the state’s academic standards, how students will be tested on those standards and plans to help to failing schools.

McCormick Responds To New Federal Graduation Rate Requirements

Jul 12, 2017

A new federal education law would make thousands of diplomas known as general diplomas no longer count toward a school’s graduation rate. It’s a move that Indiana’s schools chief says “blindsided” the state.

“Obviously the state recognizes those diplomas, employers are recognizing those diplomas,” says Jennifer McCormick, Indiana superintendent of public instruction. “This will just make it more problematic.”

Indiana To Change How It Calculates Graduation Rates

Jul 7, 2017

Indiana’s general diploma will no longer be considered when calculating school and district graduation rates, state officials announced Friday.

In a memo to principals and superintendents, the state said it will also no longer count students who earn general diplomas in the state’s A-F rating system.

Gov. Eric Holcomb filled two vacant spots on the State Board of Education, appointing Kathleen Mote and previous board member Tony Walker.

Mote is from Madison and is the current intermin chancellor for Ivy Tech Community College’s Columbus/Southeast Region. She replaces Lee Ann Kwiatkowski, who resigned her position to work as state superintendent Jennifer McCormick’s chief of staff.

Eric Weddle / IPBS

 

As two seats sit vacant on Indiana’s education policy-creating body, the state’s highest-ranking education official is concerned.

As Gary Community Schools prepares for a state-hired emergency manager to take control, the seat on the state education board that represents the district remains vacant.

The same goes for East Chicago Schools as it faces a lead contamination crisis in the community.

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