Jason Dombkowski

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

SHERIFF'S RACE

West Lafayette Police Chief Jason Dombkowski is one step closer to holding the highest law enforcement position in Tippecanoe County.

Dombkowski easily defeated incumbent Sheriff Barry Richard and Sheriff’s Department Lieutenant John “Woody” Ricks Tuesday night, garnering almost 50-percent of the vote.

Dombkowski says he believes the specific issues he outlined in his campaign inspired residents to go to the polls.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The Tippecanoe County Election Board Tuesday found a procedural way to release itself from investigating admittedly illegal cell phone use by Republican sheriff candidate Jason Dombkowski.

Dombkowski has paid the City of West Lafayette back for using his city-issued cell phone for duties not related to his job as police chief, but instead to his run for political office.

But despite that admission, Board chair Randy Vonderheide made it clear he considers the issue closed.

City of West Lafayette

West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis is in a unique position to comment on an increasingly chippy Tippecanoe County sheriff’s race. He’s served on a police force with incumbent Barry Richard and is currently the boss of Richard’s leading challenger, Jason Dombkowski.

City of West Lafayette

West Lafayette’s State Street partially reopened, on time, last month, and drivers have begun getting used to the new traffic patterns.

They’ve had a lot of time to do that because the new architecture leaves them idling in the road for much longer than the old setup did.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Though the announcement came a few days earlier than he’d planned, West Lafayette Police Chief Jason Dombkowski says he’s running for Tippecanoe County Sheriff in next year’s election.

A countdown on his campaign website shows there are still more than 270 days until 2018’s primary election, in which the police chief of ten years could face off against current GOP sheriff Barry Richard, who won the office in 2014.

Calls to Sheriff Richard’s office seeking comment Monday went unreturned.

Utility Associates, Inc. / http://www.bodyworn.com/features/#features-specs

The West Lafayette Police Department has signed a new equipment contract to update its body-worn camera technology.

Chief Jason Dombkowski says technology from Utility Associates, Inc. incorporates different applications, such as location tracking and safety features.

“An officer down feature – basically a cell phone – it goes vertical, it senses that and it sends an alert to dispatch and every officer working that we have an officer down,” he says.

Photo courtesy Lafayette Police Department

A new bill offered in the Indiana legislature would levy harsher penalties for crimes against public safety officials. It also strengthens penalties for crimes against their relatives.

Barbara Harrington / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Communities and law enforcement agencies across Indiana are looking to the General Assembly for guidance on police body camera policies.

West Lafayette’s police force has been using body cameras for about a year.  Chief Jason Dombkowski says he used resources from, among others, the Department of Justice and the International Association of Chiefs of Police when developing a policy for those body cams.  But he says, particularly on privacy concerns and redacting video, he’d like guidance from the legislature:

WLPD Increasing Patrols Following Two Robberies Last Weekend

Jun 16, 2015
Frédéric BISSON / https://www.flickr.com/photos/zigazou76/

The West Lafayette Police Department is increasing patrols in parts of the city where two armed robberies recently occurred.

The first incident happened early Saturday morning near Wabash Landing. The second occurred near midnight on Grant Street in the southern part of the Purdue campus.

Chief Jason Dombkowski the fact that they took place on consecutive evenings leads police to believe they are somehow connected.

zamboni-man / https://www.flickr.com/photos/42030424@N08/

Two local law enforcement agencies are joining police departments across the nation in equipping officers with an antidote to heroin overdoses.

But not everyone agrees allowing police to administer Narcan is the best response to an increase in heroin use.

West Lafayette Police Chief Jason Dombkowski says heroin wasn’t really on the department’s radar until February. That’s when a Purdue student died from a heroin overdose. And while the incident occurred in Lafayette, Dombkowski realized the department needed to be better prepared to address drug use.

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