Ivy Tech

A partnership between food banks and Ivy Tech is providing healthy produce to people around the state. The sweet corn project began two years ago when Ivy Tech’s Terre Haute campus launched a hands-on field experiment for students.

The Terre Haute agriculture program teaches modern farming technology. Its corn yield kept growing so the campus donated to local food banks.

Becky Miller with the Ivy Tech Foundation says, this summer, students planted three different fields.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

It’s fair to say Purdue President Mitch Daniels has gotten a mixed reaction to his proposal of buying online education purveyor Kaplan.

Ivy Tech Community college will undergo administrative changes this summer aimed at making each campus more community focused, addressing needs expressed by campuses across the state.

Ivy Tech’s campuses currently serve students at a regional level, but going forward they will focus on specific towns.

Every campus will have leadership focused on the specific needs of the town the campus is located in. Academics and local partnerships will focus on the specific workforce needs of that community.

A national campaign argues more Americans need to change their perceptions of mental illness and suicide. Many central Indiana cities, colleges, businesses and nonprofits are now part of that partnership.

Mental Health America reports, in 2015, more Hoosiers died by suicide than in car accidents. And one in five Hoosiers has experienced a mental illness.

Lawmakers Preach Caution As Colleges Ask For Funding

Dec 8, 2016

 

Indiana’s public colleges and universities appeared before the State Budget Committee to make their cases for funding requests. But lawmakers weren’t very encouraging.

Some lawmakers preached caution during the schools’ presentations, sounding rather pessimistic about how much money the state will have in its new budget.

Indiana University, represented by CFO John Sejdinaj, preemptively acknowledged those concerns.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

As the race to replace Mike Pence on the Indiana heated up, many eyes turned to Purdue University President Mitch Daniels.

How many talks did he have with Republican party insiders who wanted him to walk back into the governor’s office?

You’ll get that answer on this edition of WBAA’s Monthly Conversation with him.

Also on this month’s program, an interesting hypothetical from the state’s former governor:

State of Indiana / http://www.in.gov/lg/

Ivy Tech’s Board of Trustees has approved the contract for its new president -- former Indiana Lieutenant Governor Sue Ellspermann.

The contract between Ellspermann and Ivy Tech is for three years. During that first year, Ellspermann will receive an annual base salary of $300,000.

She could be paid more but not less during the next two years. She is also eligible for an annual performance based bonus that can't not exceed $100,000, in addition to other perks and reimbursements.

State of Indiana / http://www.in.gov/lg/

The trustees of Ivy Tech Community College unanimously voted Wednesday to hire former Lieutenant Governor Sue Ellspermann as the college’s ninth president.

She says the school’s biggest challenges are aligning its offerings with the needs of the Indiana's employers and improving low graduation rates.

Ivy Tech Community College

Former Lieutenant Gov. Sue Ellspermann faces more than  two dozen competitors in her bid to be the next president of Ivy Tech Community College.

More than 30 people from in and outside Indiana have applied to be the next president of Ivy Tech -- the nation's largest singly accredited statewide community college.

So far Ellspermann is the only candidate to publicly declare that she's applied. And while Gov. Mike Pence has endorsed her for the job, Ivy Tech Board Chairwoman Paula Hughes says she doesn't think that hindered others from applying.

Brandon Smith / IPBS

Eric Holcomb officially became Indiana’s 51st Lieutenant Governor Thursday.  The longtime Hoosier political figure replaces Sue Ellspermann, who left to pursue a job at Ivy Tech.

A veritable who’s who of Indiana government gathered at the Statehouse to watch Supreme Court Justice Mark Massa swear in Eric Holcomb.  The balconies ringing the atrium were crowded with lobbyists, lawmakers and politicos, all to see a ceremony that’s taken place in the middle of a term only twice in the last century. 

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