Indiana State Department of Health

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Numbers recently made available on an Indiana State Department of Health website show a significant increase in the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease among Hoosiers.

In 2011, just more than 2,000 Alzheimer’s deaths were recorded in Indiana. But in 2015 – the most recent year with state data – that figure had climbed by more than a quarter, to more than 2,500.

ISDH Launches County Profiles To Fight Opioid Epidemic

May 15, 2017

A new tool from the Indiana State Department of Health aims to help counties determine how best to respond to the opioid epidemic. Those profiles, released Monday, offer a view of how the opioid epidemic is impacting Indiana communities, county by county.

ISDH deputy commissioner Pam Pontones says the information is not meant to rank counties or serve as a comparison but rather to give counties a snapshot of their risks and trends.

 

Lead contamination has been making headlines lately: in East Chicago, Indiana, or South Bend or Bloomington. Many towns across Indiana are grappling with lead contamination, and dozens have aging, lead-based water infrastructure.

But how does a town know if it has a lead problem?

David Konisky, a professor of public and environmental affairs at Indiana University, says there’s not one single process.

Elad Rahmin / https://www.flickr.com/photos/eladrahmin/

Deaths from drug overdoses have continued to increase in Indiana, mirroring national trends reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week.

According to the CDC report, the national drug-related death rate has increased more than two and a half times since 1999.

In that same time period, state health department numbers show the number of drug overdose deaths in Indiana has gone up 570 percent. In 2015, 1,236 people died from drug-related OD's.

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The Indiana State Department of Health has announced the recipients of $13 million in grants aimed at stemming Indiana’s high infant mortality rate.

The money comes from the departments Safety PIN grant program, which the state legislature created in 2015 as a response to the concerning trend.

In, 2014, the state’s infant mortality rate was 7 per every 1000 births, compared with the national average of 5.8.

Chris Morisse Vizza/WBAA News

The Tippecanoe County Commissioners voted Monday to endorse a plan to establish a syringe exchange and services program aimed at reducing the spread of hepatitis C among intravenous drug users.

But Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski vented his frustrations after the vote.

One by one, doctors, addiction treatment professionals, researchers, church leaders and a captain from the Fort Wayne police department stepped to the podium to tell the commissioners why Tippecanoe County should create a syringe services program.

Liz Mochrie / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lizziemoch/7521193178

State health officials say frozen strawberries distributed to some Indiana restaurants are giving people hepatitis A.

In a warning to Hoosiers, the Indiana State Department of Health says multiple states are looking at a hepatitis A outbreak that may be linked to frozen strawberries imported from Egypt.

So far, eight restaurants in Marion, Hamilton, and Hendricks counties have received the recalled strawberries and served them within the last two weeks.

Sarah Fentem / Indiana Public Broadcasting

As the response to the lead contamination crisis in East Chicago, Indiana continues, public health officials are still working to get all the residents tested.

The former U.S.S. Lead Superfund site has soil lead levels as much as 100 times what the Environmental Protection Agency considers safe.

Lead can cause serious neurological problems, among other health issues. For that reason, state and local public health officials have been conducting blood lead testing.

Sarah Fentem / Indiana Public Broadcasting

It’s a Thursday, not a Sunday, but the First Baptist Church in East Chicago is open for business. The president of the state’s NAACP is hauling in large cardboard boxes of nectarines. The fruit is placed beside milk crates full of cucumbers and apples. The effect is similar to a booth at a farmer’s market, except the produce doesn’t have prices on it. It’s here for the taking.

The spread is part of a community effort organized by the NAACP. The vitamins found in fresh produce protect people from some of the harmful health effects of lead.

Nick Janzen / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Three weeks into what some agencies refer to as “National Preparedness Month,” the Indiana Department of Health has sent out a press release congratulating itself on the state’s response to health crises and reminding Hoosiers to keep themselves safe from public health concerns. But the affirmation comes at a strange time -- during a public health crisis in East Chicago.

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