Indiana Department of Correction

Thomas Hawk / https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/

A transgender inmate is suing the Indiana Department of Correction for denying her request for hormone therapy while in prison.

Anthony Loveday was diagnosed with gender dysphoria – conflict between a person’s physical gender and their gender identity -- while in prison, and says the Indiana State Prison’s denial to provide hormone therapy is unconstitutional.

An Indiana death row inmate says the state can’t use its current lethal injection drug because it didn’t follow the proper rulemaking procedures to choose it.

A trial court sided with the state; the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled for the inmate, which brought the case to the state Supreme Court.

The Department of Correction chose a new lethal injection drug cocktail in 2014 – a combination that’s never been used in this country.

Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Broadcasting

A juvenile correctional facility in southeastern Indiana started an experiment two years ago.

It distributed secure tablet computers to all of the girls.

The goal of the technology was to help improve the girls’ educational experiences and opportunities.

But the tablets are having an impact beyond the classroom.

Tablets Give Teachers, Students More Access To Educational Tools

State of Indiana / http://www.in.gov/fssa/hip/

 The Indiana Department of Correction says it has reached a milestone by enrolling thousands of released offenders in HIP 2.0 and Medicaid.  

Kate Ter Haar / https://www.flickr.com/photos/katerha/

The ACLU and Indiana Protection and Advocacy Services will get increased access for monitoring the treatment of mentally ill inmates at state prisons. That’s part of the terms of a settlement the groups reached with the Department of Corrections.

Complete isolation for days or weeks can exacerbate mental illnesses, or even cause them. Now those inmates will not be placed in solitary confinement, instead getting regular screenings by prison staff and therapy.

Thomas Hawk / https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/

An inmate at the Putnamville Correctional Facility has died after a viral outbreak at the prison. Authorities are blaming a progressive virus that causes severe shortness of breath, fatigue, joint aches, coughing and sweating.

18 patients began to show the pneumonia-like symptoms last week. Nine were sent to the hospital after their symptoms got worse. One of those patients died, and another is on a ventilator.

Thomas Hawk / https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/

The final budget proposal released Tuesday provides around $80 million for community corrections programs.

The amount is in between the House and Senate budget proposals.

The House budget would have appropriated more than $80 million additional for community corrections, while the Senate came in at $56 million.

The money in the new proposal goes to the state, which then doles it out via grants to local programs.

Senate budget architect Luke Kenley, R-Noblesville, says all the stakeholders involved will have to make progress reports every three months.

Scott / https://www.flickr.com/photos/skippy/

Hoosier license plates will no longer be produced by Department of Correction inmates.

After a months-long bidding process, the Bureau of Motor Vehicles signed a contract with Intellectual Technology Incorporated for the California-based company to produce the state’s license plates.

That five-year contract began after the state’s contract with 3M, which had previously produced the plates, ended in December.

3M, under its contract, had hired PEN Products, the Department of Correction’s manufacturing program, to make the plates.

Larry Farr/morguefile

Some major money is flowing into the Indiana Department of Correction to address brain trauma. The department has been awarded a $1 million federal grant to screen and provide treatment for released offenders who have traumatic brain injuries. Edinburgh Correctional Facility Superintendent Frances Osburn is leading the project and says their goal is to minimize the risk of re-offending and ultimately help lower the state's incarceration costs.

The Indiana Department of Correction (DOC) is set to appear in District Court  Wednesday afternoon to answer allegations of mistreating mentally ill inmates.

A U.S. District Court judge told the state in December to improve the way they handle mentally ill inmates. The DOC was accused of locking inmates with mental disabilities in solitary confinement for hours at a time.

Pages