Hoosier State line

Steven Vance / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesbondsv/

A leading contender has emerged to replace Amtrak in operation of the Hoosier State passenger rail line, which runs between Chicago and Indianapolis. 

The state and local communities will now try to reach an agreement with Corridor Capital.

Federal funding for the Hoosier State Line ran out last year and the state, along with local communities along the line that include Lafayette, Indianapolis and Rensselaer, stepped in to subsidize it for a year. 

The state also began seeking proposals to improve the line and make it less costly to taxpayers. 

West Lafayette and Tippecanoe County have finalized plans to fund Amtrak’s Hoosier State Line for one year. The city will pay $16,667 a month and the county’s share is $25,000 a month.

Mayor John Dennis says the agreement creates an oversight board made-up of the state and communities funding the service.

WL could spend $200K on Hoosier State Line

Nov 1, 2013

The West Lafayette city council will decide Monday whether or not to contribute $200,000 to help keep the Hoosier State Line running for at least another year.

Several cities along the passenger rail route from Indianapolis to Chicago are providing a combined $2.5 to replace funds that used to come from the federal government.

West Lafayette mayor John Dennis says Amtrak must make improvements to the service before a long-term deal can be reached.

The agreement funds the service for a year, with an optional four-month extension.

The Hoosier State passenger rail line will keep running for another year after the state reached an agreement Tuesday with Amtrak just hours before funding was scheduled to run out. 

An Indiana transportation official says a short-term deal to keep the Hoosier State passenger train line running is still possible before funding runs out this week. 

Congress decided in 2008 to cut off federal funding for passenger lines in more than a dozen states.  Indiana is the only state in the region that hasn’t reached an agreement with Amtrak.  Funding is expected to run out October 16 and officials are working on a short-term agreement that will keep the line running while long-term negotiations continue.

Conversation with Purdue's president for September

Sep 26, 2013
Purdue University

Purdue President Mitch Daniels talks about his schedule of public appearances, including recent speaking engagements and interviews on national cable TV shows.

He also discusses the recently announced Purdue Moves initiative and weighs in on the funding issues related to Amtrak's Hoosier State Line.

Keeping passenger rail service going on the Hoosier State Line will be a costly effort. That’s the finding of a cost-benefit analysis the Indiana Department of Transportation commissioned.

Federal funding for the Amtrak service between Chicago and Indianapolis ends next week.

A cost-benefit analysis looks at eliminating the line, keeping it as is, and four different improvement scenarios.

INDOT begins Hoosier State negotiations with Amtrak

Sep 24, 2013

The Indiana Department of Transportation is negotiating now with Amtrak on continuing the Hoosier State Line. Federal funds run out October 1st for the four-days-a-week service between Chicago and Indianapolis.

An INDOT spokesman says more information will be revealed Thursday during a joint study committee of the legislature on transportation issues. The hearing includes testimony from local leaders along the Hoosier State Line.

Amtrak summit in Lafayette

Aug 19, 2013

Passenger rail service in Indiana is expected to take a big hit October 1. That’s the day federal funding ends for the Hoosier State Line.

Amtrak is asking the Indiana Department of Transportation for $3 million to keep trains running four-days-a-week between Indianapolis and Chicago.

Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski says losing the Hoosier State Line would hurt the state and local economies.

IN lawmakers eye funding for train service

Apr 15, 2013

Funding for Amtrak’s corridor route in the state becomes the responsibility of the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) in October. A lack of dollars would impact the Hoosier State route that runs from Chicago to Indianapolis. It has stops in Dyer, Rensselaer, Lafayette and Crawfordsville.

State Representative Randy Truitt (R-West Lafayette) says he hosted a meeting of other lawmakers, Amtrak officials and representatives from INDOT recently to discuss funding options. He thinks not acting is doing a disservice to the state of Indiana.

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