healthcare

Healthcare Partnership Aims To Help Children With Autism

Aug 3, 2017

Finding the right doctor or medical services for children can be hard. Finding those same services for children with autism can be even more difficult.

“In the autism world there can be long waits for services, there tend to be limited resources and difficulty accessing services that are needed,” says Tracy Gale, director of autism and behavior services at Easterseals Crossroads, the largest disability services organization in Indianapolis. “It can be very overwhelming for families.”

Gov. Eric Holcomb continues to avoid specifics when it comes to the impact federal health care reform could have on the state.

Holcomb sent a “Letter to Hoosiers” Monday to outline what he wants from federal health care reform. That includes greater state control over the issue. But he declined to share specific data on how federal health care legislation debated in the Senate would affect Indiana.

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Sarah Fentem and Lauren Chapman / Side Effects Public Media

As Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell works to drum up votes for his health care bill in Congress, people in his home state worry about what they could lose if the bill passes.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

A potential challenger to U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita (R-Lafayette) held a vigil in Lafayette Tuesday night to decry the House's passage of the American Healthcare Act.

Democratic 4th District candidate Sherry Shipley gathered with Greater Lafayette residents to hear concerns about the proposed replacement for Obamacare.

Many attendees spoke out about what they feel was a lack of representation from incumbent Rokita as the bill was crafted.

Shipley says both diversity and medical professionals are missing from the conversation in Washington.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

A bill moving from the state House to Senate this week would expand the number of vaccinations Indiana’s pharmacists may give to patients. It’s the latest evidence of the profession’s growing role in the healthcare industry, but the possibility the question: Are patients sacrificing quality for convenience?

Pharmacies used to simply be a place where you could pick up your pills — and maybe a cane or a page of stamps. But these days, pharmacy services are expanding.

Jim Nix / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimnix/6168273244

Approximately 1,000 Hoosiers showed up in Indianapolis Sunday to protest congressional efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The rally was organized by a coalition of local and state-wide organizations, including Planned Parenthood, the Indiana Democratic Party and the state chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America.

Rallies across the U.S. were spurred in part by Senator Bernie Sanders (who was not in attendance at the Indianapolis event).

Presidencia de la República Mexicana / https://www.flickr.com/photos/presidenciamx/

The Indiana Supreme Court has declined to take up a case that questioned whether an uninsured Fort Wayne man was entitled to information about hospital rates for other, insured patients.

In 2013, uninsured Goshen resident Thomas Frost stayed at Parkview Hospital in Fort Wayne for weeks after being seriously injured in a 2013 motorcycle accident. After Frost was discharged, Parkview said he owed nearly $630 thousand in hospital fees.

Hoosier Teens Lag In Medicaid Coverage

May 26, 2016
Christiana Care / https://www.flickr.com/photos/christianacare/

Indiana adolescents participate in Medicaid and children’s health programs at a significantly lower rate than their younger counterparts, according to data from the Urban Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Of 13-to-18 year olds in Indiana who can receive Medicaid coverage, 83 percent are actually enrolled. That’s compared with 89 and 88 percent of kids 0-5 and 6-12, respectively. That 5 percent gap is standard across the U.S., although the national participation rates are higher on average.

M Statehttps://www.flickr.com/photos/mstate/

Despite a shortage of nurses in Indiana, five nursing programs in the state are in danger of being shut down by the State Board of Nursing for their graduates’ lackluster performance on license exams.

After a student completes a nursing program, he or she is required to take a licensing exam before becoming employed.

If a school’s pass rate on the exam falls below 80 percent (a standard deviation below the national average) for three years or more, it has to create a correction plan. If it still doesn’t improve, its accreditation can be taken away.