Harvest

Indiana is set to have unexpectedly big corn and soybean harvests this fall. That means continued tight profit margins for farmers and more low food prices for consumers.

Purdue University agronomists made their annual announcement of the state’s crop production forecast at the State Fair Thursday.

They say yields should better than expected, after weeks of wet, patchy weather. But economist Chris Hurt says that extra supply for the same demand will mean bad prices for Hoosier farmers.

Uneven, wet weather is complicating the growing season for Indiana farmers.

There’s much more cash cropland this week that has too much moisture in its soil than at this time last year, according to the USDA’s latest crop progress report.

And the federal agency says the current condition of Indiana’s corn and soybeans isn’t as good as it was a year ago.

Valerie Everett / https://www.flickr.com/photos/valeriebb/273444106

 

Indiana farmers aren't harvesting quite as much corn as expected this year — but they should still have record yields for soybeans.

As of this month, the USDA is expecting Indiana soybean yields of 59 bushels per acre. It's even better than their initial forecast, and it beats 2014's state record.

accozzaglia dot ca / https://www.flickr.com/photos/aged_accozzaglia/2705768470

 

Harvest season is beginning for corn and soybeans in Indiana.

The latest USDA numbers say 74 percent of Indiana corn is mature, and 15 percent has been harvested. That's a little better than average. Soybeans are slightly behind, with 9 percent harvested as of this week.

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David Wright / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dhwright/14934151279

The truck traffic at Kokomo Grain Company is constant.

"We will process between 400 and 500 trucks a day in the 12-14 hour day at this facility," says Senior Grain Merchandiser Mike Silver.

He says all of the truckloads of corn and soybeans can add up to 750,000 bushels per day. Trucks dump the grain quickly, but a long line soon snakes around the Kokomo Grain’s entrance.

Indiana and several other Midwestern states are poised to break records with this year’s yields, so the grain elevators here are already halfway full.