free speech

Purdue University

Another round of flyers posted by a racist group at Purdue University has called free speech rights on campus into question.

Supporters of the white supremacist group placed posters at several universities as part of a higher education-targeted campaign, and Purdue officials are once again condemning the speech they say doesn’t uphold university values.

President Mitch Daniels says Purdue’s notoriety may have made the West Lafayette campus a target.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

At the beginning of this academic year, Purdue President Mitch Daniels sent a letter to the campus community in which he said Purdue would not stand for the kind of violence that struck Charlottesville, Virginia – another college town – just before the school year began.

But he’s also said that much of the violence on American college campuses in the last couple years has been instigated by left-wing student groups.

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The Tippecanoe County Commissioners are one vote away from changing their policy on how the county courthouse may be used for displays and demonstrations.

The previous policy, which allowed the commissioners to approve or deny permits as they saw fit, was struck down by a federal court earlier this year.

The new policy is, in the words of county attorney Doug Masson, “viewpoint neutral,” though it retains restrictions on when a display may occur – mostly to avoid disturbing legal proceedings in the courthouse.

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A list that claims to document and expose professors who discriminate against conservative students includes three Indiana educators.

It’s the work of Turning Point USA, a nonprofit organization whose website says it seeks out young conservative activists. But spokesman Matt Lamb says it’s a non-partisan group.

Purdue University

The issue of free speech on a college campus has already been tested at Purdue in 2016.

From anti-abortion protestors using fiery rhetoric in an effort to rile up passersby to a University employee posting threats of rape on social media, the newly-adopted “Chicago principles” of free speech have been tested almost to their limits.

On this month’s conversation with Purdue President Mitch Daniels, we ask if the school put itself in a tough spot by advocating for expanded freedom of expression.

The Indiana Supreme Court of has ruled the state’s Bureau of Motor Vehicles is allowed to regulate what people print on their personalized license plates.

A previous decision by a lower court had ruled the BMV violated free speech rights and due process when it prohibited the issuance of certain license plates such as one belonging to a police officer that said “OINK.”  

Brownsburg Community Schools

A pair of Brownsburg cafeteria workers says the Community School Corporation violated their First Amendment rights when it punished them for expressing their opinions on social media, and have filed a lawsuit against the school system in federal court.

Tina Gracey and Brenda Farnsworth allege the school took unconstitutional disciplinary action against them for posting in a Facebook group that criticized two proposed ballot referenda.

Scott / https://www.flickr.com/photos/skippy/

The Indiana Supreme Court will consider the future of Indiana’s personalized license plates after the state and the ACLU each had their say over a lawsuit challenging the program.

Greenfield Police Officer Rodney Vawter, with approval from the Fraternal Order of Police, had a license plate that read “0INK.” 

The Bureau of Motor Vehicles revoked it, calling it inappropriate.  The ACLU of Indiana, on behalf of Vawter, sued the BMV, saying its policy violates free speech rights. 

Purdue University

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says the national inflation rate for 2014 was about 1.6-percent. That means employees who receive raises of 1.6-percent are just keeping pace with an increased cost of living.

So when Purdue proposed a 3-to-3.5-percent raise for many employees, it came as a welcome respite from years of raises in the 0-to-2-percent range. On this month’s conversation with Purdue President Mitch Daniels, we ask him how he arrived at that number and how it’ll be doled out.

The Associated Press is reporting that when Purdue President Mitch Daniels was governor, he took rare steps to eliminate what he considered liberal breeding grounds at Indiana’s public universities.

The email exchange in February of 2010 shows Daniels requested that historian Howard Zinn’s writings be banned from classrooms and that he asked for a “cleanup” of college courses he called “propaganda.”

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