Education

Education news

A Senate Committee slashed funding Wednesday from a House bill that sought to double the state’s preschool pilot program.

Senate lawmakers wasted little time amending House Bill 1004 to mirror their own version of legislation to expand state-funded preschool and offer additional funding to other early learning initiatives.

At the halfway point in the legislative session, the bills passed in the first half, by House or Senate, move on to the other chamber.  So this week, a few education bills that made that cut got their first hearing in the House or Senate education committees.

The House committee only heard two Senate bills this week, one regarding emergency medications in schools and another on 529 savings plans.

Purdue University

Very few freshmen in Purdue University’s incoming class are affected by President Trump’s latest immigration order. And for those students who are, the school is hoping to secure waivers of the travel ban. 

Prospective Purdue students from countries affected by President Trump’s new executive order may face difficulty in obtaining their student visas if their waiver requests are denied.

President Donald Trump’s new executive order on immigration does not apply to people on visas – but there’s another change to the visa program for skilled immigrant workers that could put a strain on foreign hires at Indiana universities.

The temporary change to the H-1B visa program would halt what’s called “premium processing,” which speeds up visa applications for foreign, highly skilled workers.

The second half of the legislative session begins this week, and the House and Senate have two very different bills to expand state funded pre-K.

Both bills passed out of their original chambers and are now being considered by the opposite chamber of the statehouse. Before the session, both Republicans and Democrats supported expanding the pilot program and allocating more money for preschool scholarships for low-income children.

Let’s take a look at these two pre-K proposals and where each bill stand now:

Adding Vouchers To The Pre-K Equation

For the first time the number of Hoosier students using publicly-funded vouchers to attend a private school reached 3 percent of statewide enrollment, according to a new report.

Indiana’s Choice Scholarship Program hit a record 34,299 students this academic year using the controversial tuition support but the overall growth of the program appears to be slowing down.

Indiana Pre-K Expansion Moves Forward At Statehouse

Feb 28, 2017

Lawmakers voted Tuesday to advance a proposal to expand state-funded preschool in Indiana.

In a 41-9 vote, state senators pushed ahead a two-year, $32 million proposal that would modestly expand state-funded preschool beginning July 2017.

“It is not universal pre-K, there are a finite number of potential 4-year-olds [covered],” says Sen. Travis Holdman (R-Blufton), who authored the bill.

Northeast Indiana Regional Partnership / https://www.flickr.com/photos/northeastindiana/

Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne has completed a survey concerning the name change that will happen when the campus is reorganized.

During the ten days the online survey was in the field, more than 4,500 responses were submitted. About two-thirds came from current students and alumni, and they seemed to reject one of the two possibilities suggested to them. Chancellor Vicky Carwein told Purdue’s Trustees the name Purdue University Northeast didn’t find favor because the school’s acronym could be read as “puny.”

This week marked the last committee meetings of the first half of the session, as both chambers scramble to wrap up any bills they want to move forward into the second half of the session. Monday and Tuesday are the last days both chambers can approve a bill if they want it to move forward. The legislature will then take the rest of the week off and return the following Monday.

Appointed State Superintendent Gets Surprising Vote

Bonuses Inconsistent With Teacher Performance Statewide

Feb 22, 2017

 

Heather Peacock is part of a family of educators.

“Both my sister and sister-in-law are teachers,” she says.

The three of them teach in different school districts in the Indianapolis area: Zionsville, Perry Township, and Wayne Township, where Peacock works. Right before the holidays, they all received their state-issued bonuses for being good teachers.

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