Education

Education news

State Names Muncie Community Schools Emergency Manager

Jun 26, 2017

The state has named the new emergency manager for Muncie Community Schools. The financially impaired district will soon be run by a company called Administrator Assistance.

The company of independent contractors includes retired teachers, business managers, and school administrators. Courtney Schaafsma is a member of the Distressed Unit Appeals Board, or DUAB, the board responsible for choosing Muncie Community Schools’ emergency manager.

Ivy Tech Community college will undergo administrative changes this summer aimed at making each campus more community focused, addressing needs expressed by campuses across the state.

Ivy Tech’s campuses currently serve students at a regional level, but going forward they will focus on specific towns.

Every campus will have leadership focused on the specific needs of the town the campus is located in. Academics and local partnerships will focus on the specific workforce needs of that community.

Rural Schools Explore Tactics To Save Their Districts

Jun 14, 2017

 

There are two school districts in Wabash, Indiana, not enough students to fill both, and both are struggling financially.

Jason Callahan is superintendent of one of these districts, Wabash City Schools, and he’s made a lot of changes to save money.

“At some point you can’t cut any more,” Callahan says. “We’re down to one elementary, one middle school one high school, in our whole district, so there’s no more buildings to reorganize.”

Gov. Eric Holcomb filled two vacant spots on the State Board of Education, appointing Kathleen Mote and previous board member Tony Walker.

Mote is from Madison and is the current intermin chancellor for Ivy Tech Community College’s Columbus/Southeast Region. She replaces Lee Ann Kwiatkowski, who resigned her position to work as state superintendent Jennifer McCormick’s chief of staff.

Richard Lee / https://www.flickr.com/photos/70109407@N00/

The Indiana State Board of Education has approved the acceptance of vouchers by four private schools with a history of low performance and academic failure.

All four schools had lost their ability to enroll new students in the Choice Scholarship program because they’d been rated a D or an F on the state’s accountability system for at least two consecutive years.

But a new law allows private schools in this situation to seek a one-year waiver.

Without a waiver, schools would need years of academic improvements to accept new voucher students.

Tippecanoe, Howard Among Pre-K Expansion Counties

Jun 7, 2017

Low-income families in 15 counties will soon be able to use state money to send their 4-year-old children to preschool. Indiana’s first pre-K pilot included five counties – some urban and some rural.

One of the additional counties is Delaware, where Carrie Bale runs the By5 Early Childhood Initiative. She says while she’s glad for the new opportunity, the expansion includes a new requirement that could exclude families that need the service.

The Indiana State Board of Education approved four private schools with a history of low performance and academic failure to accept publicly funded vouchers to cover tuition for incoming students during a meeting Wednesday.

The schools had lost their ability to enroll new students in the Choice Scholarship Program because they had been rated a D or F on the state’s accountability system for at least two consecutive years.

U.S. education secretary Betsy DeVos weathered a volley of questions this week about a Bloomington, Indiana, private school that receives state-funded vouchers but reserves the right to deny admission or discontinue enrollment to students from lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender families.

The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) released its 2016 State Preschool Yearbook Wednesday, which shows Indiana’s early childhood education efforts don’t match those of other states, but recent legislation shows improvements in how the state funds preschool.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos visited a high-performing private Indianapolis high school Tuesday, where nearly every student receives a voucher. She toured Providence Cristo Rey High School on a fact-finding mission and meet students and staff.

DeVos’ school visit follows a Monday speech in Indianapolis where she alluded to “an ambitious” federal expansion of school choice. DeVos did not lay out details of what a federal program could look like.

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