Education

Education news

Why This Indiana School District Is Going Completely Solar

Dec 12, 2016
Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Earlier this year, people across Indiana got word energy prices were going up - leading school districts to scramble to budget for the increase.

But, as Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Peter Balonon-Rosen reports, the news led one rural district in the heart of central Indiana to a unique solution – become one of the state’s first completely solar powered school systems.

Sheridan Community Schools has taken a unique approach to managing energy costs. It's now one of the state’s first completely solar powered school systems.

Lawmakers Preach Caution As Colleges Ask For Funding

Dec 8, 2016

 

Indiana’s public colleges and universities appeared before the State Budget Committee to make their cases for funding requests. But lawmakers weren’t very encouraging.

Some lawmakers preached caution during the schools’ presentations, sounding rather pessimistic about how much money the state will have in its new budget.

Indiana University, represented by CFO John Sejdinaj, preemptively acknowledged those concerns.

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IPFW

The women’s studies program at Indiana University--Purdue University Fort Wayne will not be eliminated, as was previously suggested in a plan to cut costs. The new proposal will cut costs by eliminating one job, and cutting the director’s pay.

Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Broadcasting

A juvenile correctional facility in southeastern Indiana started an experiment two years ago.

It distributed secure tablet computers to all of the girls.

The goal of the technology was to help improve the girls’ educational experiences and opportunities.

But the tablets are having an impact beyond the classroom.

Tablets Give Teachers, Students More Access To Educational Tools

ISTEP+ Panel Submits Recommendations For Writing New Test

Nov 29, 2016

The ISTEP+ panel, a 23-person committee tasked with writing a recommendation for re-writing the state’s assessment system, voted on a final version Nov. 29. Rather than promoting the sweeping changes that many, including the legislature wanted, the final plan offers slight differences from the state’s current test.

The most notable changes from the current assessment system:

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Public Domain. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons

The Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Faculty Senate passed a vote of no confidence Monday against the university’s chancellor, Vicky Carwein.

NYC Department of Education / http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

The 2016 ISTEP+ scores show the number of students passing the test decreased for the second year in a row.

Fifty-two percent of students passed both the English Language Arts and Math sections of the test. This is compared to 53 percent in 2015.

Fewer students passed just the English Language Arts test- 66 percent this year compared to 67 percent in 2015.

Fifty-nine percent of students passed the math section in 2016, a drop from 61 percent in 2015.

House Committee on Education and Workforce / https://www.flickr.com/photos/edlabordems/4579749374

Indiana’s former schools chief Tony Bennett and U.S. Rep. Luke Messer are two names swirling around Washington, D.C. as possible picks by President-elect Donald Trump to be the Secretary of Education, according to journalists and policy advisors at a forum Monday.

ISTEP Panel Finishes Broad Plan To Submit To Legislature

Nov 15, 2016

The state’s ISTEP panel concluded its meetings Tuesday with a broad set of recommendations. Chair Nicole Fama will compile what was said for a recommendation to the legislature. The panel will vote on that recommendation at its final meeting, Nov. 29.

Rachel Morello / Indiana Public Broadcasting

After a school referendum failed last week, Gary Community Schools is asking the state legislature for help as it struggles with ongoing financial problems.  

The school referendum was posed after years of financial struggle and failed by only 300 votes. The district sent a letter to staff Friday, saying it wouldn’t make payroll on time.

This is the district’s second referenda to counter decreasing enrollment in recent years. Both have now failed.

When students leave a district, state money goes with them, and Gary schools struggle to maintain staff and buildings.

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