Education

Education news

WFIU/WTIU News file photo

 

More Indiana high school students than ever are earning college credit.

More than 60 percent of 2016 graduates received advanced placement or dual credits, according to the Indiana Commission for Higher Education’s latest college readiness report. That’s up from 47 percent just four years ago.

Sean Tierney is an associate commissioner for policy and research with the Commission. He says this means high schoolers are better prepared for college.

Who Decides How To Protect LGBTQ Student Rights?

Jun 15, 2018
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(Pixabay)

School policies across the state to specifically address the rights of lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender or queer (LGBTQ) students vary, and advocacy groups say those can have a long-term impact on kids.

The state’s first set of coalition schools received approval from the State Board of Education Wednesday. The group of districts will waive some state requirements to change how they offer career and technical education, or CTE.

State's Virtual Schools Committee Holds First Meeting

Jun 13, 2018

A new state committee focused on virtual charter schools met for the first time Tuesday. It marks the beginning of an investigation into those schools by state officials.

A key lawmaker at the Indiana statehouse is urging other legislative leaders to focus more on school safety and is asking for an annual study committee on the issue.

Early Learning Grants Awarded In 16 Counties

Jun 6, 2018
(Elle Moxley/StateImpact Indiana)

The state is giving different early learning providers across Indiana more funding as a part of efforts to improve quality and access to preschool programs.

The Family and Social Services Administration (FSSA) announced the recipients of more than $1.5 million dollars in grant money this week, for expanding the capacity of early learning across the state.

Dyslexia: Finally Finding Time In The Spotlight

Jun 6, 2018

Grant Hartley is a fourth grader. He loves playing with Legos after school and says his favorite subject is gym.

Grant likes school, but he struggles sometimes – he has dyslexia.

For some people with dyslexia, reading typed words on a page is just as frustrating as trying to read a bowl of alphabet soup.

“It’s kind of hard like you got to figure out like which one would make the best sense in a sentence,” he says.

Indiana Schools Recognized For Counseling Programs

Jun 1, 2018

A national organization says Indiana is a leader for comprehensive school counselor programming and services, and several Hoosier schools earned special recognition from the group.

Jill Cook, assistant director of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), says the Indiana school counseling scene is strong compared to other states.

“Indiana has been a great leader in showing the possibilities of collaboration with the state association and with the state department of education,” she says.

State Withholds Funding For 4-Year-Old Kindergartners

May 30, 2018

Schools who choose to enroll 4-year-olds in kindergarten will pay the price, as a new law prevents schools from receiving state dollars for kids who aren’t old enough at the start of the school year.

Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett announced the program at Chapel Hill 7th and 8th Grade Center. (Photo by Sarah Panfil/WFYI)

Indianapolis Mayor Joe Hogsett announced plans Tuesday to fund $2 million in new scholarship programs for low-income residents. It’s part of a broad effort to address gaps in the labor market, and to help more residents attain post-secondary credentials.

In his State of the City address last year, Hogsett announced the creation of a task force that would work to improve college access for low-income residents.

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