college tuitions

State lawmakers are discussing whether to a change a 2011 law that prohibits young people brought into the country illegally from accessing in-state tuition at public colleges.

Indiana is one of only three states in the country that specifically makes immigrant students who can not prove state residency or who don’t qualify for a federal program to pay the more expensive out-of-state tuition rate.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

A recent study shows Republicans -- the group that elected Purdue University President Mitch Daniels to two terms as governor -- have a souring view of whether higher education is worth it anymore.

So on this edition of WBAA's Monthly Conversation With Mitch Daniels, we ask him why conservatives might see college as less of a good influence, even as Democrats see it as more and more worthwhile.

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80-percent of Indiana’s upcoming high school seniors eligible for the state’s 21st Century Scholars program aren’t meeting the requirements to receive those scholarships. 

The legislature created new requirements for the 21st Century Scholars program back in 2011.  At the time, only about 10-percent of students who earned the scholarships were graduating college on time. 

John Walker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/whatcouldgowrong/4608963722

A state program that covers up to 100-percent of college tuition is seeing more students ready to graduate in four years. State officials credit the rise to a 2013 law requiring students complete a certain number of credits each year -- or lose their aid.

Commissioner of Higher Education Teresa Lubbers says there’s only so much state financial aid money available.

“You always have limited state dollars, so you want to spread those as broadly as you can to benefit the largest number of students,” Lubbers says.

Kevin Dooley / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pagedooley/

Illinois public colleges are strapped for cash, and that could impact higher education in Indiana.

More than halfway into the fiscal year, Illinois Republican governor Bruce Rauner and the Democratic-controlled legislature are deadlocked over the state budget.

The impasse means that state's 12 public universities and 48 community colleges haven't received one cent of state funding going on nine months.

It's a nerve-wracking time for students who are on the line for tuition because the state isn't paying out money for grants and scholarships.

State of Indiana / http://in.gov/

Groups which often disagree on education are uniting behind a proposed scholarship to coax more top students into teaching careers.

House Republicans have made the scholarship bill a priority this session.

It would offer students in the top 20-percent of their high school class as much as $30,000 for college, in exchange for a commitment to teach for five years afterward.

The scholarship proposal drew support from teachers' unions, education reform groups, State Board of Education members and state school superintendent Glenda Ritz.

Bill Erickson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mg315/381296439

 A Purdue economist says President Obama’s push to offer two years of government-funded tuition at community colleges may backfire.

The President will seek approval from Congress to offer two years of federal and state-funded community college, with the federal government paying for three-fourths of tuition and states pays the remainder.

Conversation with Purdue's president for February

Feb 21, 2013
Purdue University

  A reorganization of the upper administration at Purdue is inevitable. That’s the assessment of President Mitch Daniels.

He says successful executives are often lured away by other universities. Daniels adds that some careful and thoughtful streamlining is likely, but a top-to-bottom overhaul is not needed.

Daniels made the comments during his first in-studio interview with WBAA since becoming president.

Taking an issue he highlighted during his State of the Union address on the road, President Obama this morning told an audience at the University of Michigan that he is "putting colleges on notice" that the era of unabated tuition hikes is over, as The Associated Press reports.