Holy Meatballs! IKEA Coming To Indiana

Nov 10, 2015

Hoosiers should start fishing out their allen wrenches from the back of the junk drawer…because Indiana is getting its own IKEA.  Indiana residents have had to trek north to Chicago or east to Cincinnati to buy a bed with an difficult-to-pronounce name and enjoy the chain's signature Swedish meatballs, but in two years they’ll be able to visit the Scandinavian furniture behemoth’s new location in Fishers.

IKEA Spokesman Reed Lyons says they chose Fishers because they needed a large plot of land in an area that would draw customers statewide.

Jim Grey /

Significant tax relief for Hoosier employers could be on the horizon if the state’s revenues do well the next few months.

Indiana took out a more than $2 billion loan from the federal government at the height of the recession to pay unemployment benefits.  It’s been paying it back ever since. 

And as long as the state owes money on the loan, employers have to pay a penalty. 

This year, that penalty is $105 per employee; next year, it rises to $126. 

Indiana Economic Development Corporation

A group of nearly 20 lawyers and judges will convene this summer to establish parameters for a new type of court in Indiana. The state already has specialty courts that try drug cases or those involving veterans – but most of those are criminal cases.

The newest courts will hear complex civil cases brought between businesses. Commercial courts exist in almost two dozen other states and help to clear cases which would otherwise bog down a docket. They’re designed to be “business friendly” – but what that means for a state is a bit of a gray area.

U.S. Senate /

Indiana Senator Dan Coats predicts the Senate will approve fast-track trade authority this week for a Pacific Rim trade deal, but says getting there may be a tough slog.  Several Democrats are defying President Obama to try to block fast-track, which would allow the administration to begin final negotiations on the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and let the eventual deal come to the floor without amendments.

David Lofink /

29-percent of Hoosiers live in places with local ordinances protecting gays and lesbians from discrimination. And that proportion could grow in the wake of last week‘s religious freedom controversy.

Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard blasted the now-revised religious objections law as "ridiculous." Carmel already has an executive order prohibiting discrimination against gays and lesbians in city hiring -- Brainard says he‘ll send the city council an ordinance to add sexual orientation to local civil rights laws.