Brian Bosma

GOP Leaders Unveil Final Road Funding Package Details

Apr 20, 2017

 

Republican legislative leaders unveiled what Speaker Brian Bosma calls the “best infrastructure program” in state history.

GOP leaders say the funding package they’ve put together will eventually generate about $1.2 billion a year for state and local roads. Senate President Pro Tem David Long (R-Fort Wayne) says that plan will last the next two decades.

“We’re not kicking the can down the road like they do in Washington,” Long says.

 

The controversy over Ricker’s convenience stores’ ability to sell cold beer and hard alcohol grew more contentious as the House killed a bill that would’ve let Ricker’s keep its permits.

At issue are restaurant permits Ricker’s was able to secure at two of its convenience stores. Those permits allow them to sell cold beer and hard liquor for carryout – previously, the sole right of liquor stores and restaurants.

House Democrats Unveil Road Funding Plan

Feb 6, 2017


House Democrats unveiled their road funding plan, billing it “No New Taxes.”

The House Republican roads plan uses fuel tax increases, new fees and tolling.

Holcomb: "The State Of Our State Is Sound"

Jan 17, 2017

 

 

 

Gov. Eric Holcomb used his State of the State address to make another pitch for creating a long-term, sustainable road funding plan. But he also continues to avoid specifics on how to pay for that plan.

Legislative leaders have said they want the governor to be a strong voice for the tax increases that are likely to be part of the road funding plan. Holcomb only says that if the state asks Hoosiers to invest more in their infrastructure, the return will be worth it.

 

Gov. Eric Holcomb told Indiana factory owners Wednesday that he and the state legislature will do more this year to help find and train new workers.

At the Indiana Manufacturers Association’s annual legislative briefing, Holcomb said he knows factories are struggling to find enough qualified employees.

Top House Committee Leadership Jobs Open

Nov 21, 2016

 

Two significant House committees will have new leadership after their chairs left the chamber this year.

The House Public Policy Committee chair retired this year and the Utilities, Energy and Telecommunications chair moved to the Senate. Those two high profile positions now up for grabs in the House GOP caucus.

But political analyst Ed Feigenbaum says not to expect too much change in the direction of either committee.

Indiana Public Broadcasting

Republicans in both the Indiana House and Senate retained their supermajorities in Tuesday night’s GOP wave.

House Republicans poured hundreds of thousands of dollars in the final weeks of the campaign into races in northwest Indiana.

They were concerned about losing at least two or three seats there, possibly even more.

When the dust settled, they’d lost only one – Democrat Mara Candelaria Reardon took back a seat from Republican Bill Fine she’d lost in 2014.

The House GOP will return in January with a 70-30 majority, down from 71-29.

Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Governor Mike Pence got his chance Tuesday to sound vice presidential for Donald Trump as the Republican presidential candidate’s decision on a running mate approaches.

The two met in Indianapolis earlier in the day, prior to a private fundraiser.

Pence was effusive in his praise for Trump at the Republican presidential hopeful’s rally in Westfield.

Pence declared to a crowd of more than a thousand that Trump “gets it” and hears the voice of Americans.

Meet The People Who Decide The Future Of School Testing

Apr 29, 2016
Benjamin Chun / HTTPS://WWW.FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/BENCHUN/

The panel that will decide the future of Indiana standardized testing is now complete, officials announced Friday.

 

Gov. Mike Pence and House Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis) separately announced appointments to the panel that will recommend a replacement for Indiana’s current standardized test, the Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress-Plus or ISTEP+. 

The announcements follow appointments earlier this week from other state officials. 

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

The Indiana Supreme Court Tuesday ruled it will not force Indiana lawmakers to release their emails under the state’s public records law.  The Court says to do so would violate the state constitution’s separation of powers.

Citizen advocacy groups, including the Citizens Action Coalition, filed a lawsuit to gain access to emails between a House Republican legislator and utility companies. The state’s public records law exempts what’s called “legislative work product,” but doesn’t define what that means. 

Pages