beer

Sonia Belviso / https://www.flickr.com/photos/soniabelviso/

A recent study finds the taste of alcohol is closely linked to addiction markers in the brain.  

The research project from a team at the IU School of Medicine is the first to use two different types of advanced brain imaging techniques to strengthen evidence that reward receptors in the right side of the brain are tied to addiction. 

Assistant Research Professor of Neurology Brandon Oberlin says the study, conducted with 28 male beer drinkers, sought to find out what areas of the brain are 

  involved when a beer drinker tastes beer.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/anotherpintplease/

The Indiana State Fair sold alcohol for the first time since the 1940s in 2014 – but only at a beer and wine exhibition closed to anyone under 21. And patrons couldn’t carry alcohol out.

The second year, the Fair added sales at concerts in the Coliseum.

This year, alcohol is sold at Free Stage concerts. Representative Ed Clere (R-New Albany) co-sponsored the 2014 bill and says he trusts Fair officials to balance higher revenue with the right atmosphere.

“The balance is making sure that it stays family-friendly," Clere says.

Matthew Peoples / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leftymgp/7332282888

A Greencastle brewer is benefiting from a piece of  10-year-old economic development legislation that makes him eligible for a liquor license, even though the county has reached its limit. 

Former teacher and home brewer Chris Weeks can’t wait to be serving up locally brewed beer and burgers in the former downtown Greencastle NAPA building.

“I was actually given a Mr. Beer kit over five years ago for Christmas, and I quickly realized that I loved brewing," he says.

Quinn Dombrowski / https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/

Lafayette’s Loeb Stadium, the 75-year-old 3,500-seater in Columbian Park, is home to the Colt World series, American Legion baseball and Jefferson High School’s team. But when it comes to professional ball, things have never quite worked out for the ballpark.

As was announced this week, a consortium that owns several Midwestern collegiate teams is ready to try again.

Federal Judge: Beer Wholesalers Still Can't Sell Liquor

Oct 1, 2015
Dawn Ellner / https://www.flickr.com/photos/naturesdawn/

 

A federal judge has rejected a plea from Indiana's largest beer wholesaler to sell liquor.

Monarch Beverage sued to get rid of Indiana's law that prohibits beer wholesalers from dealing liquor (and vice versa) -- they have to choose between the two. The company says this law is an equal protection violation and thus unconstitutional.

Judge Sarah Evans Barker says Monarch, in her words, "entirely failed" to show there's any company being treated differently.

Senate Passes Ron Alting's Beer-tripling Allowance

Feb 26, 2015
Bernt Rostad / https://www.flickr.com/photos/brostad/5053316697

The Indiana Senate Tuesday passed a bill that would allow Indiana microbreweries to manufacture more alcohol per year.

Sen. Ron Alting (R-Lafayette) says the amended legislation is the result of a compromise between alcohol wholesalers and microbreweries.

The bill allows small breweries to increase their annual production limit from 30,000 barrels per year to 90,000.

The other half of the bill requires breweries distribute that alcohol through a wholesaler if their production exceeds 30,000 barrels.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/anotherpintplease/

Sun King and other small Indiana breweries are a step closer to being allowed to make more beer.

The House Public Policy Committee passed a bill from Rep. Ed Clere (R-New Albany) that would allow craft beer brewers to triple the amount of beer they can make and sell within the state each year.   

Right now, the limit is 30,000 barrels - if a brewery makes more, it has to obtain a different permit and is no longer allowed to distribute its own beer.

Wayan Vota / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dcmetroblogger/535670898

Indiana liquor stores, once the biggest opponents of legislation legalizing Sunday alcohol sales, are now backing the bill after a House committee made a major change Wednesday.

The original bill simply legalized Sunday alcohol sales.  The amended bill does that too, while creating significant new regulations for non-liquor stores that sell alcohol. 

The measure would require clerks at grocery and convenience stores to undergo the same training that liquor store employees do.