ArcelorMittal

Indiana’s ports move millions of tons each year of the stuff that’s made and used at Midwest factories, including steel, grains and coal. The three ports – one on Lake Michigan and two on the Ohio River – connect Indiana to the national and global economies, and each has to find its own ways to keep up with change.

For the first part of a three-part series, we visited the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor to see how it’s secured its place in the steel industry.

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The U.S. Commerce Department is using a new monitoring system to shed light on how steel moves around the world.

Industry watchers say it could drive long-term policy changes to protect American steel from the effects of foreign trade.

 

The first installment of the new Global Steel Trade Monitor ranked China first in the world for steel exports, and the U.S. first for imports.

David Wilson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidwilson1949/12783674125

Steelmaker ArcelorMittal, whose largest North American mill is at Indiana Harbor in East Chicago, is introducing a new high-strength steel for cars.

It's part of an effort to boost profits at the world's largest steel producer by volume -- amid an uncertain time for the industry.

The new steel is designed for the interior rails and pillars that make cars safer during a crash.

A spokesperson from Arcelor says it should make cars lighter and cheaper to produce when it's rolled out next year.  

ArcelorMittal

 

Governor Mike Pence is backing U.S. Steel in calls for an investigation into China's steel industry.

That's after the federal government imposed new tariffs on China last week -- a move some steelworkers say doesn't go far enough.

Last month, U.S. Steel asked the U.S. International Trade Commission for a total ban on Chinese steel imports, saying practices overseas have cost thousands of American jobs.