alcohol

Controversial Issues Dominate 2018 Study Committees

May 15, 2018
House Speaker Brian Bosma (R-Indianapolis) says he's not sure hate crimes need to be studied further. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana lawmakers will consider a number of controversial issues in study committees this year – including hate crimes and the Department of Child Services.

David Shankbone / Wikimedia Commons

A Senate panel voted Wednesday to get rid of proposed alcohol regulations that would have governed where alcohol is housed in stores and who’s legally allowed to ring it up.

Some advocates decry the elimination of what they call safeguards the same day the governor signed a bill expanding alcohol sales to Sundays.

The proposed bill would have required all cashiers conducting alcohol sales to be at least 21-years-old. But a Senate committee stripped out that provision.

Committee Chair Files Sunday Sales Bill

Dec 22, 2017

Legalized Sunday alcohol sales took an incremental step forward in the legislative process this week. Rep. Ben Smaltz (R-Auburn) filed legislation on the issue for the 2018 session – as he previously said he would.

Alcohol Tax Increase Unlikely In 2018 Session

Dec 21, 2017

Indiana’s alcohol excise tax hasn’t changed in 36 years. And the state’s Alcohol Code Revision Commission thinks it should, recommending a 25 percent increase.

But Senate Public Policy Committee Chair Ron Alting (R-Lafayette) says that won’t happen in 2018.

Alcohol Commission Prepares For Final Report

Oct 24, 2017

Members of a panel examining the state’s alcohol laws began to prepare their final recommendations for the General Assembly on Tuesday. With just a few meetings left, some are concerned about the group tackling so much.

There was discussion at the latest meeting about relatively small issues related to alcohol sales, like direct wine shipping and alcohol disposal.

But commission member Terry Bauer says with such a tight timeline the group needs to focus on two big issues – legalizing Sunday sales and allowing certain businesses to sell cold beer.

city of West Lafayette

West Lafayette’s mayor wants to give people more places to have an adult beverage – as long as those new establishments follow some stricter rules than most West Lafayette bars currently do.

It’s allowed under a law in which mayors whose cities have so-called “riverfront districts” – as Lafayette and West Lafayette do – can authorize liquor licenses.

Youth Survey Finds Vaping, Tobacco And Drug Use Down

Aug 25, 2017

An annual survey of Indiana teens finds the use of tobacco, vapor, alcohol and drug use on the decline.

This year the 27th Youth Survey from the Indiana University’s Indiana Prevention Resource Center analyzed answers from more than 126,000 Hoosier students – sixth to 12th grade – at 409 schools around the state. The questions cover issues ranging from use of various drugs to gambling and mental health.

The study first included the use of electronic vaping products two years ago and has found a steady decrease in the number of teen’s vaping every year.

Indiana’s growing number of wineries and small vineyards want to make the Hoosier state synonymous with wine country.

Yet, a tricky climate limits what grapes they can grow in-state, and complex regulations limit where they can sell the resulting wines.

So these local wine destinations are finding other ways to make their marks.

At Two-Ee’s Winery near Huntington, the barrels and tanks in the production room are full of juice from grapes you’ve probably never heard of.

Change could be coming for Indiana’s alcohol laws after legislative leaders announced a two-year study of the state’s alcohol statutes. And legislators say the special commission won’t involve the alcohol industry.

Controversy this past session over convenience stores obtaining alcohol carryout permits – otherwise expressly prohibited in state law – prompted the creation of the alcohol law study commission.

WFIU Public Radio

Indiana lawmakers taking a comprehensive look at the state’s alcohol laws gave industry representatives a chance to weigh in during a Tuesday study committee meeting.

The Public Policy Study Committee’s first meeting was all about the history of Indiana’s alcohol laws. At the second, for those who’ve followed alcohol debates over the years, it was more of the same.

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