Mara Liasson

Mara Liasson is the national political correspondent for NPR. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines All Things Considered and Morning Edition. Liasson provides extensive coverage of politics and policy from Washington, DC — focusing on the White House and Congress — and also reports on political trends beyond the Beltway.

Each election year, Liasson provides key coverage of the candidates and issues in both presidential and congressional races. During her tenure she has covered six presidential elections — in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012. Prior to her current assignment, Liasson was NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Clinton administration. She has won the White House Correspondents Association's Merriman Smith Award for daily news coverage in 1994, 1995, and again in 1997. From 1989-1992 Liasson was NPR's congressional correspondent.

Liasson joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter and newscaster. From September 1988 to June 1989 she took a leave of absence from NPR to attend Columbia University in New York as a recipient of a Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Economics and Business Journalism.

Prior to joining NPR, Liasson was a freelance radio and television reporter in San Francisco. She was also managing editor and anchor of California Edition, a California Public Radio nightly news program, and a print journalist for The Vineyard Gazette in Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

Liasson is a graduate of Brown University where she earned a bachelor's degree in American history.

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President-elect Donald Trump's Cabinet is taking shape. Today he announced that Georgia Congressman Tom Price, a longtime opponent of Obamacare, will be the head of Health and Human Services. Elaine Chao is his choice for transportation secretary.

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President-elect Donald Trump is busy trying to staff his government and decide which of his many campaign promises he wants to keep and which he wants to discard. We will hear from a member of his transition team in a moment.

The election of Donald Trump was a surprise to pollsters, pundits and, perhaps most of all, the Democratic Party. With Republicans in power in the White House, Senate and House of Representatives, Democrats will now have to figure out their role as the minority party.

Here are four questions the Democrats will have to grapple with as they think about the future.

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If the biggest political story this year is the rise of Donald Trump, then the second-biggest is probably what's happening inside the Republican Party. We're going to dig into that with NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hi, Mara.

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Now we're going to look at some of the political implications of the FBI's announcement as well as some of the other big trends to watch for on Election Day. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is here in the studio. Hi, Mara.

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