Brandon Smith

IPBS Statehouse Reporter

Brandon Smith is excited to be working for public radio in Indiana. He has previously worked in public radio as a reporter and anchor in mid-Missouri for KBIA Radio out of Columbia. Prior to that, he worked for WSPY Radio in Plano, Illinois as a show host, reporter, producer and anchor. His first job in radio was in another state capitol, in Jefferson City, Missouri, as a reporter for three radio stations around Missouri. Brandon graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a Bachelor of Journalism in 2010, with minors in political science and history. He was born and raised in Chicago.

Ways to Connect

Indiana Public Broadcasting

Republicans in both the Indiana House and Senate retained their supermajorities in Tuesday night’s GOP wave.

House Republicans poured hundreds of thousands of dollars in the final weeks of the campaign into races in northwest Indiana.

They were concerned about losing at least two or three seats there, possibly even more.

When the dust settled, they’d lost only one – Democrat Mara Candelaria Reardon took back a seat from Republican Bill Fine she’d lost in 2014.

The House GOP will return in January with a 70-30 majority, down from 71-29.

Nathan Gibbs / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nathangibbs/

The tone of Indiana’s Senate race turned sharply negative essentially since Evan Bayh joined the campaign in July.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith talks to some of the candidates about that tone and explores what impact it will have as the race enters its final stretch.

If you’ve watched TV or listened to the radio in Indiana the last few months, you’ve probably heard an ad like this:  “Bailout Bayh. A sellout, not a senator.”

And this: “Congressman Todd Young will hurt our families.”

Nathan Gibbs / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nathangibbs/

An Indiana University law professor says state officials’ handling of a possible voter fraud investigation threatens the legitimacy of the election. 

An investigation into a group called the Indiana Voter Registration Project has led to accusations of voter fraud from the State Police and Secretary of State.

Patriot Majority USA, the group behind an Indiana voter registration effort currently being investigated by the State Police, wants some records of that investigation unsealed.

More than a month ago, the State Police began investigating the Indiana Voter Registration Project for possible voter fraud.

That came after reports that some registration applications had missing or incorrect information.

Lynn Friedman / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lynnfriedman/18263113926

Indiana’s unemployment rate remained unchanged in September, the first time in five months the rate didn’t go down.

The Indiana unemployment rate stayed at 4.5-percent last month. That’s still its lowest level in nearly a year and lower than all of its neighboring states.

The private sector added about 10,000 jobs for the month, the sixth consecutive month of increases. Gains came in almost all employment areas - the only outlier was the trade, transportation and utilities sector, which shed 1,300 jobs.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The Indiana Democratic Party Thursday accused Secretary of State Connie Lawson of incompetence, partisanship and inflammatory rhetoric surrounding recent voter fraud allegations.

About a month ago, the Indiana State Police began investigating a group called the Indiana Voter Registration Project for possible voter fraud.

That progressive advocacy group then accused state Republicans of inhibiting liberal get-out-the-vote efforts. The police investigation is now in 56 counties.

Jashin Lin / WTIU News

The three candidates for Indiana’s open U.S. Senate seat met Tuesday in a debate marked by pointed attacks. Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith reports.

For Republican Todd Young and Democrat Evan Bayh, the debate was as much about their opponent as it was themselves.

Young repeatedly attacked Bayh for his support of Obamacare, which Young calls a “millstone” around the economy.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Thousands of Hoosier voters’ registration information has been changed – leaving many unsure if they’re still registered.

Secretary of State Connie Lawson’s office received complaints from voters who couldn’t find their registration information or discovered that information had been changed.

That includes changes to first names and birth dates.

Lawson’s office says it discovered thousands of records have been altered and has passed that information onto the State Police for an investigation of possible voter fraud.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Surrogates for the presidential campaigns are urging Hoosiers to get to the polls even before Election Day.

A recent poll suggests Republican Donald Trump’s lead in Indiana could be down to just five points. Trump-Indiana campaign chair Rex Early says he doesn’t believe it.

“We’ve been all over the state and the energy and the people we talk to…boy they are strong Trump people,” Early says. 

Early says he’s been working to go into small towns and typically ignored areas of the state to drive out the vote for Trump.

WFIU Public Radio

Indiana lawmakers taking a comprehensive look at the state’s alcohol laws gave industry representatives a chance to weigh in during a Tuesday study committee meeting.

The Public Policy Study Committee’s first meeting was all about the history of Indiana’s alcohol laws. At the second, for those who’ve followed alcohol debates over the years, it was more of the same.

Pages