"The families of those who were seriously hurt when the Indiana State Fair Grandstand stage rigging collapsed" on Aug. 13, are struggling with "a mix of hoping and coping," The Indianapolis Star writes this morning.

Good morning.

The fight for control of Tripoli continues, as we reported earlier. From Libya, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports that what had looked like it might be a quick victory for opponents of Moammar Gadhafi is turning into what could be "a bitter, difficult battle."

Libyan rebels seized control of Moammar Gadhafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound Tuesday after NATO airstrikes blasted a hole in an outer wall.

Hundreds of fighters poured inside the fortress-like complex and raised the opposition flag over Gadhafi's personal residence. The Libyan leader and his family were nowhere to be found, however.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, reporting from inside the compound, said the rebels were firing weapons into the air and that civilians were streaming in by the thousands to join in the celebration.

Fighting Flares In Tripoli

Aug 23, 2011

The situation in Libya remains very fluid. As NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro said on Morning Edition, there was "a stunning turn of events" on Monday.

Former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel served two presidents, represented Illinois in Congress, and on Tuesday, will mark his 100th day as mayor of Chicago. He promised early to put his own mark on Chicago as he took on the city's challenges. Some think he's succeeding.

In the anteroom at City Hall, Emanuel is surrounded by Chicago memorabilia. A few books about Chicago sit near caps of the city's sports teams. The new mayor says he has no regrets about leaving the national stage.

Faced with massive overcrowding, budget cuts and a weeks-long hunger strike by inmates, California is considering making changes to how it handles its toughest prisoners.

A state legislative panel will hear Tuesday about conditions at the state prison at Pelican Bay, where California's most dangerous convicts are shipped. Located near the Oregon border, Pelican Bay is hundreds of miles from any major city. It's the most isolated prison in the system: Think Alcatraz, but on land.

Advocates Urge Easier Visa Policies To Boost Startups

Aug 23, 2011

As the economy continues to sputter, many policymakers are looking to entrepreneurs to create new jobs. And many foreign-born, highly skilled entrepreneurs want to come to the United States and stay here, but immigration laws and policies haven't made that easy.

In an effort to change that the White House recently announced more flexible policies for granting visas. But many innovation experts say the changes aren't enough.

Biologist Lou Burnett was recently in his car when his cell phone rang. It was a CNN reporter, asking about the fact that his research had been featured in a new report about wasteful government spending.

That was news to Burnett, who works at the College of Charleston in South Carolina. "I was pretty irritated," he recalls.

Meredith Perry turned 22 this month. She just graduated from college and started a new company built around a technology she recently invented.

There's plenty of bad economic news these days, but Perry and her company, called UBeam, are trying to defy it — she's hiring and entertaining funding offers from investors.

Perry's invention: a transmitter that can recharge wireless devices using ultrasonic waves. It's like Wi-Fi, she says, except instead of a wireless Internet connection, her's transmits power over the air.

The new Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial is scheduled to be dedicated on Aug. 28 — the anniversary of the civil rights leader's "I Have A Dream" speech. The memorial, located on the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C., was several decades in the making. Here's a brief look at how the idea for a memorial came to fruition.

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New Release: Damrau Delights In Meyerbeer

The latest release from soprano Diana Damrau is a dream come true - for her, and for audiences! The all Meyerbeer recording, Grand Opera , combines the Choir and Orchestra of Lyon National Opera with favorites, world premieres, and three languages! Damrau spoke with John Clare about the stunning Erato cd.

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Ask The Mayor: Frankfort's Chris McBarnes On Cleaning Up Homes, Drugs and Flooding

Many months on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we focus broadly on the topic of cleanup when it comes to chatting with Frankfort’s Chris McBarnes. This month, we have a number of topics relating to that theme. We ask Mayor McBarnes whether the city needs to take a harder line with its derelict properties, after one homeowner wasn’t brought before the city despite six years’ worth of complaints. We also find out whether recent flooding that shut down several roads in the county has made the mayor...

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Former Panamanian Dictator Manuel Noriega Dies At 83

2 hours ago

Panama's longtime military dictator Manuel Noriega has died at the age of 83, according to the country's president on Twitter.

Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela tweeted that "the death of Manuel A. Noriega closes a chapter in our history."

According to the BBC:

"Noriega recently underwent an operation after suffering a hemorrhage following brain surgery.

"Noriega had been a key U.S. ally but was forcibly removed when American troops invaded in 1989 and was later jailed in the US on drugs and laundering charges.

In 1969, Philip Zimbardo, a psychologist from Stanford University, ran an interesting field study. He abandoned two cars in two very different places: one in a mostly poor, crime-ridden section of New York City, and the other in a fairly affluent neighborhood of Palo Alto, Calif. Both cars were left without license plates and parked with their hoods up.

By the end of the state legislative session in Texas on Monday, the Capitol had devolved into scuffles and grave accusations. A Democratic lawmaker had accused his GOP colleague of threatening to "put a bullet" in another lawmaker's head. That GOP state representative, meanwhile, accused a counterpart of threatening his life, saying he was prepared to use his gun in self-defense.

To understand how the day ended this way, one must first rewind to its start.

For families spread out across the country, videos and video chats have become a meaningful way to share a baby's first steps, a birthday party or a loved one blowing a kiss.

But for people in prison, rules limiting access to the Internet and cameras can make sharing these moments difficult. In Colorado Springs, an artist came up with a creative solution.

Like many proud parents, Nicole Garrens captured her son Zander's first steps on her cellphone. She wanted to share the video with her husband, Roy, but he recently went to prison in Texas.

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