The Obama administration is planning to review about 300,000 illegal immigration cases and prioritize deportations of undocumented individuals with criminal records. Those who haven't committed crimes may be allowed to apply for work permits in the U.S. Host Michel Martin discusses the new policy rule with Rep. Charles Gonzales (D-Texas), who chairs the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, student Mario Perez, and his attorney Sarah Monty.

Britain's phone hacking scandal took another sharp turn today, after the BBC reported that a former editor at News of the World received payment from News International, even after he took a job as the Prime Minister's top press aide.

The BBC reports:

These payments were part of his severance package, under what is known as a "compromise agreement".

When Clyde Jackson's wife took a $6 hourly pay cut several years ago, it was the beginning of his rapid descent from two-time homeowner to renter in an apartment complex in the working-class Washington, D.C., suburb of Greenbelt, Md.

Jackson, 51, is an African-American father of three who works for a local government sanitation agency. In December, he lost a three-bedroom brick home to foreclosure. He purchased the house for $245,000 in 2004.

The thousands of visitors at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington this week will reflect on the controversial likeness of the man, his legacy and the significance of the first nonpresident — and first African-American — immortalized on the National Mall.

But most of them probably won't know who built it.

New Home Sales Decline To Five-Month Low In July

Aug 23, 2011

Two years into the economic recovery, the housing market is still showing signs of struggle. New numbers released by the Commerce Department today showed that purchases of new homes fell 0.7 percent in July and hit the lowest level in five months.

Bloomberg reports:

We have to confess we didn't know that for decades, scientists have been trying to find the "parent yeast" that makes lager beer possible.

Apparently they were.

And now, they may have an answer: Beech forests in Argentina.

"The largest earthquake to strike Colorado in almost 40 years" shook buildings but apparently caused little damage late last night, Denver's ABC 7 News reports. A few homes may have been damaged and some rock slides were reported.

It was a 5.3 magnitude temblor and the epicenter was "about 180 miles south of Denver."

Well, at least the moth was OK when it was pulled out of St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday's ear Monday night.

According to the Post Dispatch, Holliday even took the little critter home with him.

We can't vouch for its fate after that.

"The families of those who were seriously hurt when the Indiana State Fair Grandstand stage rigging collapsed" on Aug. 13, are struggling with "a mix of hoping and coping," The Indianapolis Star writes this morning.

Good morning.

The fight for control of Tripoli continues, as we reported earlier. From Libya, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports that what had looked like it might be a quick victory for opponents of Moammar Gadhafi is turning into what could be "a bitter, difficult battle."

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Arts & Culture

Jürgen Frank

New Release: Damrau Delights In Meyerbeer

The latest release from soprano Diana Damrau is a dream come true - for her, and for audiences! The all Meyerbeer recording, Grand Opera , combines the Choir and Orchestra of Lyon National Opera with favorites, world premieres, and three languages! Damrau spoke with John Clare about the stunning Erato cd.

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WBAA Public Affairs

City of Frankfort

Ask The Mayor: Frankfort's Chris McBarnes On Cleaning Up Homes, Drugs and Flooding

Many months on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we focus broadly on the topic of cleanup when it comes to chatting with Frankfort’s Chris McBarnes. This month, we have a number of topics relating to that theme. We ask Mayor McBarnes whether the city needs to take a harder line with its derelict properties, after one homeowner wasn’t brought before the city despite six years’ worth of complaints. We also find out whether recent flooding that shut down several roads in the county has made the mayor...

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Turn That Old Car Into Cash

Get rid of your old jalopy, support WBAA and get a tax break! It's a great way to support public radio.

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Gregg Allman On World Cafe

1 hour ago

Editor's Note: Gregg Allman died May 27, 2017, at the age of 69. He's remembered by the music world as a founding member of the Allman Brothers Band and one of the pioneers of Southern rock. We revisit Allman's last visit to World Cafe in 2011, when he performed songs from his seventh solo studio album, Low Country Blues.

The Philippine military said on Sunday it had found the bodies of 16 civilians as troops tried to gain control over the Marawi, which has been under siege from ISIS-allied militants.

Update On Oregon Train Stabbings

2 hours ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Hip, Hippo Hooray For 'River Of Teeth'

4 hours ago

In 1909, the United States was suffering a shortage of meat. At the same time, Louisiana's waterways were being choked by invasive water hyacinth. Louisiana Congressman Robert F. Broussard proposed an ingenious solution to both those problems: Import hippos to eat the water hyacinth; then, eat the hippos.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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