winter weather

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

There’s a meeting scheduled for later this month in Lafayette to talk about the city’s drug addiction issues. Registration to speak was so popular the venue had to be changed to accommodate more people.

This week on WBAA’s “Ask The Mayor,” we chat with Lafayette’s Tony Roswarski about what that says for a city that’s struggled to even keep drug use from growing in recent years.

City of West Lafayette

West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis has talked frequently about how what he calls “market forces” dictate which stores and shops locate in his city, more than any recruitment effort ever could.

So as the city council tries to grapple with the impending closure of the only full-service grocery store on the Purdue campus, we’ll ask Mayor Dennis what that says about an area whose economy is supposed to be booming.

After Heavy Rains, Floodwaters Receding In 'Lucky' Indiana

Dec 30, 2015
Benjamin Stäudinger / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ontourwithben/

After peaking at 21 feet in West Lafayette, nearly twice the 11 foot flood stage, floodwaters are receding in the Wabash and Tippecanoe Rivers.

Indianapolis National Weather Service Hydrologist Al Shipe says storms dumped up to six inches of rain on West Central Indiana during the past week.  

But Tippecanoe and surrounding counties aren’t seeing the devastating floods sweeping through Missouri and Illinois because it was a dry fall, and local rivers had capacity to hold the rain.

City of Frankfort

A deep freeze like West Central Indiana is experiencing is more than just an inconvenience for some.

In towns like Frankfort, without the resources of some of its larger neighbors, winter can be especially cruel.

On this week's Ask The Mayor, we find out from Chris McBarnes what his city can do to help those in need.

Also on this week’s show, what happens when a local newspaper teams up with an Indianapolis TV station to, in their words “share content”?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

It’s fairly common knowledge that more well-traveled roads will see plows before residential streets do – it’s a function of trying to keep an entire city’s streets from becoming snarled with snowbound traffic.

But there’s more that goes into the equation which decides what streets receive salt and the edge of a plow blade first.

And it starts with making sure the plows can get on the road. At the West Lafayette street garage, Doug Perkins is using an ice pick on the salt spreader of one of the city’s plows.

Ged Carroll / https://www.flickr.com/photos/renaissancechambara/4938639714

National Weather Service meteorologists say the cold snap heading to Indiana beginning Tuesday night is going to hang around for at least the next ten days.

"Teens and twenties at night and thirties for highs," says National Weather Service meteorologist Mike Ryan. "Still looks like potential maybe for some light snow on Sunday and then also some maybe some later next week. But again, that being out a few days -- need to fine-tune that."

Ryan says the system is funneling cold air down from Canada over much of the eastern U.S.

Outlook For Winter In Indiana Unclear

Oct 17, 2014
Mira d'Oubliette / https://www.flickr.com/photos/oubliette/

At least one expert is predicting a milder winter for much of the United States this year, although the outlook for Indiana is unclear.

Mike Halpert is the Acting Director for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association‘s Climate Prediction Center.

He says the upcoming winter season in Indiana actually has an equal chance of being warmer than normal or colder than normal.  

But Halpert expects El Nino to bring warmer conditions to much of the U.S. this winter.

Mike Savage / WBAA Radio

3:45 p.m. Update:

Montgomery and Clinton Counties are among a list of nine Indiana counties whose appeal for federal winter weather funding have been approved.

Governor Mike Pence had asked federal administrators to reconsider the applications of about 30 counties that indicated the cold, snowy winter sapped their emergency preparedness budgets more than planned.