Wind Turbine

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton is focusing a lot these days on fostering cooperation.

He’s hosted the first of what he hopes will be a series of meetings with business leaders, he’s brought together multiple parties to complete a long-stalled road project and he’s working with the state on Stellar Communities projects.

Sarah Altendorf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarah_elizabeth_simpson/

Two of the three Clinton County Commissioners who will consider the future of the county’s wind energy ordinance Thursday won’t be in office to see it decided.

That’s because both Bert Weaver – who declined a taped interview -- and Cory Boyles – who didn’t return repeated calls seeking comment -- lost their primary races in May. They’ll be replaced at the start of the New Year.

But even if both men try to scuttle wind farm development in the county, it’s unlikely they’ll have the last word.

City of Frankfort

The city of Frankfort long ago identified State Road 28 as an area of concern.

The state department of transportation gave the road a topcoat of asphalt not long ago, but didn’t fix the underlying problems, pushing them off until 2019.

Now the city is trying to plan for that construction, but should it be worried the state will again kick the can down the pothole-laden road? We put that to Chris McBarnes on this edition of Ask The Mayor.

Sarah Altendorf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarah_elizabeth_simpson/

Indiana ranks 12th in the nation for the number of wind turbines, and wind energy production is projected to grow.

But Clinton County -- which had one of the state’s first wind ordinances – is now embroiled in talks about whether there will ever be any turbines there.

The Clinton County Area Planning Commission is collecting public comments from residents—for example, how much noise people are willing to tolerate—before they update its wind farm zoning ordinances.

'Battery Farm' Could Help Power 15 States

Jul 10, 2015
Joe Strupek / https://www.flickr.com/photos/strupey/6859432225

Indianapolis Power and Light has broken ground on what it says will be one of the largest energy-storage facilities in the Midwest. IPL will use interconnected, advanced batteries to store up to 20 megawatts of energy.

Ken Zagzebski, president of IPL parent company AES, says the battery array will make the power grid more reliable by smoothing out variations in supply and demand.

And he says the lithium-ion batteries will reduce emissions. He says only recently have electric companies cracked the long-standing dilemma of how to store energy for when it‘s needed.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

High overhead CityBus’s Lafayette headquarters tower three wind turbines, which whir almost melodically on this blustery winter day.

They’re the most visible sign of the corporation’s push to be more environmentally friendly.

But on the ground, there’s a different whirring sound that foretells of the newest such effort -- a generator helps run power tools and a radio playing country music as half a dozen workmen install a natural gas pumping station.

Ivy Tech Lafayette dedicates Porter Energy Center

Jul 24, 2013

Ivy Tech-Lafayette is celebrating the life of one of its instructors who died on the job.

Energy technology program chair Craig Porter suffered a fatal fall from a training tower in November, 2011. Wednesday, family, friends and administrators dedicated the Energy Center on campus in Porter’s honor.

School of Technology Dean Susan Ely says the lab and the work done there will continue his legacy.

TSC considers turbine proposal

Apr 12, 2012

A wind energy company is looking at property in the Tippecanoe School Corporation to put up a wind turbine.

Performance Services is asking the district board for approval of the project near Harrison High School.

Business Development Manager Tony Kuykendall say if it happens, the turbine has the potential to save TSC $6-millions over 25 years.

The school board listened to the proposal, but has no time table for a vote.

Kuykendall says it will likely cost the district between two-point-three and two-point-nine-million-dollars.