white supremacists

Jae Lee / WBAA News

When white supremacist literature began appearing on Purdue University’s campus, President Mitch Daniels said he didn’t want to spend time giving the promoters any more notice than they deserved.

But by one account, there have now been more than half-a-dozen incidents of hate speech or threatening actions on campus, and the campus community is putting increasing pressure on the president to take a side, rather than falling back on the school’s broad free speech policy.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

At least twice since Purdue President Mitch Daniels sent a letter to the academic community about the bigotry in Charlottesville, Virginia earlier this year, his campus has seen posters from white supremacist groups put up in public spaces.

The president has been criticized more than once for not responding strongly enough to such actions, and on this month’s episode of WBAA’s Monthly Conversation with him, we ask whether the notoriety he’s sought for Purdue has made it a bigger target.

Purdue University

Another round of flyers posted by a racist group at Purdue University has called free speech rights on campus into question.

Supporters of the white supremacist group placed posters at several universities as part of a higher education-targeted campaign, and Purdue officials are once again condemning the speech they say doesn’t uphold university values.

President Mitch Daniels says Purdue’s notoriety may have made the West Lafayette campus a target.