What's New

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The banjo was originally made by Africans in America, adapted from instruments of similar design in Africa. It is often associated with country, folk, Irish traditional and bluegrass music. But did you know the five-string banjo was been used in classical music - since before the turn of the 20th century?

Lacy Clare

Approximately one-third of adults describe their relationship with siblings as rivalrous or distant. One definition of sister “is the girl that will always be there for you – she may or may not be related to you, and could just be an amazing friend, but no matter what, is always slow to judge and quick to forgive.”

We’ll hear from two amazing sisters, Katia and Marielle Labeque on today’s What’s New.

Matt Dilyard

Tuesday, June 27th marks the 70th birthday for composer/teacher/trumpeter Jack Gallagher. Jack's music has been performed around the world, featured on stages and in broadcasts. His most recent release is piano music with Frank Huang. Host John Clare spoke with Gallagher about his birthday, returning to genres, and juggling composition with teaching.

Wikipedia

In the early 20th Century we started using term ‘melting pot’ more widely, even though it was used to describe America in the 1780s. That is mostly due to a play titled The Melting Pot. In it, the protagonist writes a symphony ‘expressing hope for a world in which all ethnicity has melted away.’ Years later, the movie Mr. Holland’s Opus tells the story of a dedicated but frustrated teacher who composes The American Symphony. Fast forward to 2011 and Adam Schoenberg writes American Symphony, inspired by the 2008 US election. 

John Clare

Contests and competitions can be popular! The first game show on commercial TV was Truth or Consequences – but hundreds of years before that, Antonio Vivaldi wrote a work called The Contest Between Harmony and Invention – that included his Four Seasons!

We’ll hear about a contest with the five finalists for the APA - the American Pianists Association on this episode of What’s New!

John Clare

A new program airs Sunday and Tuesday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.

Christian Steiner

No one is quite sure of where the term Hoosier came from, but it was definitely in use from the 1840s, to describe a resident of Indiana. Back in 1816, Indiana became the 19th state – a time where Beethoven and Schubert were both writing music in Europe.

We’ll celebrate the great state of Indiana, with musicians and orchestras from the Hoosier state, including the Indianapolis Symphony, and composer Ned Rorem on this edition of What’s New!

Christian Buchmann

A new program airs Sunday and Tuesday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


Stephanie Mackinnon

A new program airs Sunday and Tuesday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


What's New: Polish Music

Nov 11, 2016
Fred Jonny

A music festival began one September in Warsaw, following the death of Joseph Stalin. The goal was to share new music – from the West – and from Polish Composers!

We’ll hear some of the leading composers from Poland, including Witold Lutoslawski, Andrzej Panufnik, and Krzysztof Penderecki on today’s What’s New!


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