What's New

Atma Classique

When Ora, a choral group founded in 2014, began recording their Many Are the Wonders release in February 2016, they were sadden by the death of composer Steven Stucky. They included his Motet originally premiered in 2006, O sacrum convivium.

Argentine composer Osvaldo Golijov's intention for his clarinet quintet, The Dreams and Prayers of Isaac the Blind, was to fuse elements of Jewish klezmer tradition and themes with the forms of classical chamber music.

zilliacus.se

Have you ever been surprised to run into someone you know while travelling or not where you normally expect to see them? Coincidence can be a real delight. These days you might expect to see someone or even plan it, with social media tagging our location.

Long before facebook or yelp, composers and performers connected in person and through letters. We’ll hear some cool connections, made in the salon of Heinrich von Herzogenberg, and talk with violinists Renaud Capuçon and Cecilia Zilliacus on today’s What’s New.

What's New: New Baroque

Sep 13, 2017
enjott.com

You've heard of old wine in new bottles...in the Gospel according to Luke: "And no man putteth new wine into old bottles; else the new wine will burst the bottles, and be spilled, and the bottles shall perish. But new wine must be put into new bottles; and both are preserved. No man also having drunk old wine straightway desireth new: for he saith, The old is better."

We’ll hear some new music for old ensembles, and talk with composer and soprano Majel Connery from Oracle Hysterical on today’s What’s New.

martinafiljak.com

Medals have historically been given as prizes: Gold, Silver, and Bronze…They represent the first three Ages of Man in Greek mythology: the Golden Age, when men lived among the gods; the Silver Age, where youth lasted a hundred years; and the Bronze Age, the era of heroes! The custom of awarding gold, silver, and bronze medals for the highest achievers dates from at least the 18th century.

We’ll hear from award winning pianists Piotr Anderszewski, Yekwon Sunwoo, and Martina Filjak on this episode of What’s New.

RIA Novosti archive

Mstislav Rostropovich was one of the great cellists of all time. Over 100 works were written for him by composers as diverse as Krzysztof Penderecki, Olivier Messiaen, Lukas Foss, and Leonard Bernstein. We’ll hear gems with “Slava,” Rostropovich’s nickname that translates as “glory,” from a set of complete recordings on Warner Classics: Mstislav Rostropovich – Cellist of the Century on today’s What’s New.

belafleck.com

The banjo was originally made by Africans in America, adapted from instruments of similar design in Africa. It is often associated with country, folk, Irish traditional and bluegrass music. But did you know the five-string banjo was been used in classical music - since before the turn of the 20th century?

Lacy Clare

Approximately one-third of adults describe their relationship with siblings as rivalrous or distant. One definition of sister “is the girl that will always be there for you – she may or may not be related to you, and could just be an amazing friend, but no matter what, is always slow to judge and quick to forgive.”

We’ll hear from two amazing sisters, Katia and Marielle Labeque on today’s What’s New.

Matt Dilyard

Tuesday, June 27th marks the 70th birthday for composer/teacher/trumpeter Jack Gallagher. Jack's music has been performed around the world, featured on stages and in broadcasts. His most recent release is piano music with Frank Huang. Host John Clare spoke with Gallagher about his birthday, returning to genres, and juggling composition with teaching.

Wikipedia

In the early 20th Century we started using term ‘melting pot’ more widely, even though it was used to describe America in the 1780s. That is mostly due to a play titled The Melting Pot. In it, the protagonist writes a symphony ‘expressing hope for a world in which all ethnicity has melted away.’ Years later, the movie Mr. Holland’s Opus tells the story of a dedicated but frustrated teacher who composes The American Symphony. Fast forward to 2011 and Adam Schoenberg writes American Symphony, inspired by the 2008 US election. 

John Clare

Contests and competitions can be popular! The first game show on commercial TV was Truth or Consequences – but hundreds of years before that, Antonio Vivaldi wrote a work called The Contest Between Harmony and Invention – that included his Four Seasons!

We’ll hear about a contest with the five finalists for the APA - the American Pianists Association on this episode of What’s New!

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