water

Daniel X. O'Neil / https://www.flickr.com/photos/juggernautco/

Purdue research showing that during some months, residents along the Wabash River use an amount of water equal to the river’s entire volume has raised questions about a new problem – tracking all that h2o. A study from the university’s school of civil engineering shows a huge lack of cooperation among county, state and federal agencies when it comes to reporting water usage.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

The Wabash River occupies a comfortable position in Indiana consciousness. The state designated the waterway as its official river in 1996, and marching bands and a cappella groups pay it homage before Purdue football games and the Little 500 bicycle race. But until earlier this year, no one knew exactly how much the state depended on the river.

Daniel X. O'Neil / https://www.flickr.com/photos/juggernautco/

Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller says the Hoosier State will join a lawsuit challenging the Environmental Protection Agency’s new water rule. 

The EPA recently finalized a rule broadening the definition of “waters of the United States” – that is, which bodies of water fall under federal regulation.  The term would now include small bodies of water, including streams, ponds, and drainage ditches. 

Jim Grey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mobilene/476706221

Indiana will face serious challenges when it comes to water resources within the next 20 years if the state doesn’t begin correcting its issues now.  That’s according to the lead researcher in an Indiana Chamber of Commerce report released Friday.

Lafayette prospecting for water

Nov 13, 2012
Mike Loizzo / WBAA Radio

The City of Lafayette is looking for greater water capacity, in case future growth requires it.

The city can pump 24 million gallons of water per day now, even though homes and businesses use only about 10 million.

Still, Lafayette is testing the water supply under the old Aretz Field, north of State Road 25 and Interstate 65.

The search for water at the old airport began a few years ago. In 2010, the city acquired 16 acres at the southeast corner of the property.

Summer sewage rates extended in Lafayette

Sep 10, 2012

Lafayette is encouraging its residents to beautify their property despite the summer drought.

The city is extending summer sewage rates, so homeowners won’t be charged more for watering their lawns and gardens.

Mayor Tony Roswarski says it’s a one-time move based on unique circumstances.

The extension is for one month.

Each year, Lafayette reduces the amount of sewage charged to residents during the summer for these watering purposes.