Wabash River

Wabash River Enhancement Corp.

National Weather Service officials say all the rain clouds this month may hold a silver lining for Indiana.

NWS hydrologist Al Shipe says this year was shaping up similarly to the most recent drought year of 2012 – until recently.

“This was the second-warmest start of the year to the record warm year of 2012," Shipe says. "Starting in early May of 2012, it got warmer and drier. This year, it got cooler and wetter.”

Shipe says that means it’s likely the state has at least forestalled, if not escaped, the possibility of a drought this year.

Lafayette Could See Riverfront Promenade Completed By 2017

Aug 19, 2016
Visit Lafayette-West Lafayette / http://www.homeofpurdue.com/attractions/riehleplazameyersbridge.html

One piece of a community-wide dream to develop public space along the Wabash River is close to becoming a reality in Lafayette, thanks largely to private donors. 

If the promenade project stays on track, pedestrians could be strolling along the riverfront promenade in the fall of 2017. 

The city has advertised for subcontractors to bid on the construction of the promenade, a public walkway that will start at Riehle plaza on its north end and stretch south to the South Street and Columbia Street bridges. 

Daniel X. O'Neil / https://www.flickr.com/photos/juggernautco/

Purdue research showing that during some months, residents along the Wabash River use an amount of water equal to the river’s entire volume has raised questions about a new problem – tracking all that h2o. A study from the university’s school of civil engineering shows a huge lack of cooperation among county, state and federal agencies when it comes to reporting water usage.

After Heavy Rains, Floodwaters Receding In 'Lucky' Indiana

Dec 30, 2015
Benjamin Stäudinger / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ontourwithben/

After peaking at 21 feet in West Lafayette, nearly twice the 11 foot flood stage, floodwaters are receding in the Wabash and Tippecanoe Rivers.

Indianapolis National Weather Service Hydrologist Al Shipe says storms dumped up to six inches of rain on West Central Indiana during the past week.  

But Tippecanoe and surrounding counties aren’t seeing the devastating floods sweeping through Missouri and Illinois because it was a dry fall, and local rivers had capacity to hold the rain.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

The Wabash River occupies a comfortable position in Indiana consciousness. The state designated the waterway as its official river in 1996, and marching bands and a cappella groups pay it homage before Purdue football games and the Little 500 bicycle race. But until earlier this year, no one knew exactly how much the state depended on the river.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

It may be dozens of years and tens of millions of dollars in the future, but officials from the greater Lafayette area have big dreams for developing the Wabash riverfront.

In 2008, the Wabash River Enhancement Corporation, a nonprofit comprising representatives from the Lafayette, West Lafayette and Purdue communities, created a master plan envisioning a unified, walkable riverfront in the same vein as Louisville, Kentucky’s.

Jason Jenkins / https://www.flickr.com/photos/acrcc/

 

Asian carp are wreaking havoc on rivers across Indiana – most recently in Monroe County.

The invasive species has been detected in Salt Creek, sparking fears that the fish will make their way into nearby Lake Monroe. The Department of Natural Resources is alerting fishermen to try and prevent that from happening.

But if Asian carp do end up in Lake Monroe, there’s not much the state can do to get rid of them.

IDEM Looking Into Wabash River Fish Kill

Aug 21, 2015
Andrea Pokrzywinski / https://www.flickr.com/photos/andreagp/2741289470

The state is trying to figure out what’s killing fish in northeastern Indiana, near the source of the Wabash River.

Indiana Department of Environmental Management officials took samples from the river this week nad tests came back positive for a species of blue-green algae, which could be part of the problem.

Indiana Department of Environmental Management Spokesman Dan Goldblatt says they’ve confirmed there’s an algal bloom in the Wabash River.

Jim Grey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mobilene/476706221

Indiana will face serious challenges when it comes to water resources within the next 20 years if the state doesn’t begin correcting its issues now.  That’s according to the lead researcher in an Indiana Chamber of Commerce report released Friday.

WL property owners begin paying stormwater fee

Jan 2, 2014

The New Year means a new fee for West Lafayette residents.

It’s being assessed on homes and businesses to address stormwater issues, such as flooding and pollution run-off to the Wabash River.

Mayor John Dennis says the fee is needed to meet federal and state environmental requirements.

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