vaping liquids

The legislative focus of this year’s session wasn’t a mystery. Lawmakers already spent more than a year debating road funding. And so it wasn’t a surprise when Gov. Eric Holcomb told the General Assembly this in the first weeks of session.

“I will work with you to establish a plan that invests in the new projects for the future that ensures Indiana will remain The Crossroads of America,” Holcomb said.

But it was not the only big goal – or debate – this session.

Legislation is headed to the governor that eliminates many of the state’s monopoly-creating, vaping regulations.

While the legislation deletes several rules, it installs new regulations, including certain packaging and labeling requirements and a mandate that manufacturers disclose their ingredient list with state regulators.

It does not prohibit online sales.

Few Issues Remain Undecided In Vaping Regulations Bill

Apr 17, 2017

 

House and Senate authors of new vaping regulations say they’re in 99 percent agreement on the bill as the session’s end draws near.

There’s general agreement in the e-liquid bill about rules that include reporting ingredients to state regulators and certain labeling and bar code requirements.

House Approves Vaping Regulations Bill

Apr 6, 2017

The House overwhelmingly approved a bill to regulate Indiana’s vaping industry, aiming to undo a monopoly created by existing law.

Indiana’s existing e-liquid law forced dozens of manufacturers to either leave the state or shut down, leaving only seven sanctioned companies.

A federal court ruling earlier this year struck down the bulk of existing regulations.

House Committee Wrestles With Vaping Regulations

Mar 29, 2017

 

Legislation regulating e-liquids – used in e-cigarettes – has gotten complicated as a House committee struggles to impose rules on the industry while avoiding constitutionality issues.

Indiana’s existing vaping regulations essentially created a monopoly, forcing dozens of manufacturers to shut down or move. That prompted lawsuits and an FBI inquiry.

 

Stakeholders in Indiana’s vaping industry say they’re happier with legislation regulating e-liquids after more changes in a House committee.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

A bill designed to significantly reduce the restrictions on manufacturers who make e-liquids for vaping devices in Indiana had its first hearing in a Senate committee Wednesday. The bill is a response to highly-controversial regulations that went into effect last year.

Barbara Brosher / Indiana Public Broadcasting

A Marion County judge Thursday rejected a request Thursday to halt Indiana’s new e-liquid regulations that are set to take effect next month. 

The trade group Hoosier Vapers filed a lawsuit last year challenging new rules that dictate how liquids for e-cigarettes can be manufactured in Indiana.

Hoosier Vapers says the law is unconstitutional and the state is overstepping its regulatory authority.

As part of its lawsuit, the group asked for a preliminary injunction that would stop the regulations from going into effect July 1. The judge ruled against them. 

Barbara Brosher / Indiana Public Broadcasting

An Indiana Vaping trade and consumer advocacy group has filed a lawsuit to block a law that is set to take effect next July.

The law, passed this year sets several new regulations for the makers of e-liquids, including one that requires stores that make their own e-liquids to have specific security standards at their place of business.

Hoosier Vapers chairman Evan McMahon says security companies like A-D-T and Siemens have said they cannot meet those needs--and without that security, individual stores will not qualify for the state’s new license standards.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Youth e-cigarette use is on the rise and state cessation programs are having to adapt their outreach. But, it’s unclear if existing anti-smoking campaigns can keep up with the trend.

In Clinton County, schoolchildren assemble for Red Ribbon Week, where a woman shows them one of the newest “drugs.” The “drug” in question is about the size of a pen, and it’s found increasingly in the hands of schoolkids.

“I’ve seen it at one of my baseball games before in Fishers.”

“And at Walmart, or not Walmart, but at like CVS.”

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