vaccines

Whooping Cough Cases On The Rise In Indiana

Jul 28, 2017

Twice the number of whooping cough cases have been recorded compared to this time last year and the Indiana State Department of Health is investigating. Outbreak supervisor Shawn Richards says

“One, is what we’re seeing normal?” says Richards. “Two, are there epidemiological links to other schools or states?”

For the first half of the year, 136 cases of pertussis or whooping cough have been reported compared to 66 in 2016.

The state says the increase could be due to more cases being reported or a waning vaccine. Richards says it could also be something else.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

A bill moving from the state House to Senate this week would expand the number of vaccinations Indiana’s pharmacists may give to patients. It’s the latest evidence of the profession’s growing role in the healthcare industry, but the possibility the question: Are patients sacrificing quality for convenience?

Pharmacies used to simply be a place where you could pick up your pills — and maybe a cane or a page of stamps. But these days, pharmacy services are expanding.

West Point-The U.S. Military Academy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/west_point/

Purdue University is the latest school to offer free mumps vaccines to help combat the spread of a campus outbreak of the highly contagious virus

Four people at Purdue came down with the virus this week, bringing the total number of confirmed cases on Indiana college campuses to 50.

Mumps is of particular concern for schools this time of year, says Tippecanoe County Health Department Administrator Craig Rich. Events such as Little 500 and Purdue’s Grand Prix mean a higher likelihood the virus could be passed between schools.

TheoJunior / https://www.flickr.com/photos/theojunior/

Purdue University announced Wednesday the school is investigating five probable cases of the mumps virus on its West Lafayette campus.

The school joins three other schools playing host to mumps outbreaks so far this year.

State health department data says the largest mumps outbreaks have occurred at Indiana University and Butler University, who have reported 17 and 24 confirmed cases, respectively.

Matt Allworth / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mattallworth/

Public health experts are noting the differences in vaccination requirements at Indiana colleges in the wake of three schools announcing cases of the mumps this year.

For public schools in Indiana, the rules for vaccinations are simple. The law requires anyone attending to have shots protecting them from diptheria, tetanus, measles, mumps and rubella.

But with private schools, it’s a little more complicated, says Ross Silverman, who teaches health policy and management at the IU School of Public Health:

Kreg Steppe / https://www.flickr.com/photos/spyndle/535493117

Governor Mike Pence says he lobbied against legislation encouraging more young people to get vaccinated against human papilloma virus, or HPV, because of concerns about government mandates. 

The proposed House bill, authored by Rep. Sue Erringto (D-Muncie), set a goal for the state to have 80 percent of 13-to-15 year olds vaccinated against HPV by 2020. 

HPV is a virus linked to several forms of cancer, including cervical cancer, and only around 20-percent of Hoosiers are currently vaccinated against it. 

Indiana Keeping Up With National Vaccination Average

Aug 29, 2014
hitthatswitch / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ringai/

The Centers for Disease Control says Indiana ranks well when it comes to childhood immunizations.

The CDC released its National Immunization Survey Thursday.

he survey says the entire nation did better in 2013 than in 2012 in immunizing infants between the ages of 19 months to 35 months of age.

CDC Pediatrician Dr. Amanda Cohn says Indiana‘s measles coverage is 92%.

She says that comes as the CDC has noted a rise in measles cases.

Raymond Bryson
https://www.flickr.com/photos/f-oxymoron/

As the school year begins for some students this week, doctors and schools want to remind parents that the state‘s immunization requirements have changed slightly.

Two doses of Hepatitis A vaccine are now required for all incoming kindergarten students before they can attend school, and those two doses must be at least six months apart.

People without health insurance don't get enough preventive care — simple but important things like vaccinations and blood tests.

But surely having insurance every now and then is better than none at all, because people can get caught up on their tests when they are covered, right?

That's a widely held view, and one that would be good news to the millions of people who go on and off health insurance each year. Some of them are losing or changing jobs. Others slide on and off Medicaid as they take on temporary work, marry or divorce.