U.S. EPA

 

Lead contamination has been making headlines lately: in East Chicago, Indiana, or South Bend or Bloomington. Many towns across Indiana are grappling with lead contamination, and dozens have aging, lead-based water infrastructure.

But how does a town know if it has a lead problem?

David Konisky, a professor of public and environmental affairs at Indiana University, says there’s not one single process.

Aristrocrat-hat (Flickr)

Five coal plants in Indiana ranked in the top 100 for both toxic and greenhouse gas pollution, according to a new analysis from the Center for Public Integrity.

That’s more “super polluters” than any other state in the country.

Claire McInerny/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Latasha Marshall waits for a cab. She sits in the lobby of a Hilton Garden Inn, which serves as her living room this week.

The Environmental Protection Agency put her up for the week so the agency can deep clean her home; it tested for high levels of lead.

"The other night when we first got here, I went to sleep and I woke up and I was at ease,” Marshall says. “I haven’t been sleeping like that at home."

Once it’s clean, she can return with her daughters, ages 11, 16 and 17, but not to stay.

Duke Energy / https://www.duke-energy.com/power-plants/coal-fired/edwardsport.asp

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management, or IDEM, is writing new rules for the disposal of coal ash.

The update is part of a federal overhaul aimed at tightening regulations governing coal combustion residuals, or CCRs.

The waste, commonly referred to as coal ash, is a byproduct of burning coal for electricity.

The new rules from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set requirements for how electric utilities dispose of coal ash.

But the EPA leaves it up to the states to write a plan for meeting the federal requirements.