Unemployment

 

The latest federal employment numbers show jobs growing more quickly in urban areas than rural ones across the country – despite low unemployment across all regions.

Seventy percent of job growth from 2016 to 2017 was in places with more than a million residents, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Meanwhile, rural places still struggled to create new jobs and maintain their workforces.

In Indiana, data shows 29 counties gaining jobs more slowly than the national rate in the past year, and another 23 losing jobs overall.

Indiana says it wants to help train train more Hoosier workers for in-demand jobs. Two grant programs will help cover tuition for career certificates and training costs for employers in what the state calls “high-demand” areas.

The legislature approved $10 million apiece over two years for the two programs – the Workforce Ready Grant and the Employer Training Grant.

Andreas Johannsen / https://www.flickr.com/photos/andjohan/564471485

Indiana’s unemployment declined in July, the third consecutive month the rate went down. The rate is now the lowest it’s been since the start of the year:

More than 11 thousand Hoosiers found jobs in the private sector in July, pushing Indiana’s unemployment rate down to 4.6percent. The rate has dropped .2 percent the last three months. That’s the longest period of sustained decline since the first half of 2015.

July’s employment gains were boosted largely by the professional and business sector, while leisure and hospitality jobs saw a significant drop.

Lynn Friedman / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lynnfriedman/18263113926

The number of unemployed Hoosiers decreased last month, the first time Indiana’s jobless rate has declined since September of last year.

The unemployment rate went down two-tenths of a percent in May, falling to five percent.

That’s the largest one-month decline in more than a year. 

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Indiana is seeing a boom in manufacturing job creation – outpacing most of the country. And even more jobs will open up as baby boomers retire.

Many businesses are working harder to fill those jobs with military veterans, like 57-year-old Tim Turner.

Right now, he shares a house on a quiet street northwest of downtown Indianapolis with two other formerly homeless veterans.

J.D. Gray

President Obama returned to Elkhart Wednesday seeking to bring a major part of his presidency full circle, trumpeting what he sees as the city's and the nation’s economic resurgence. 

But as Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith reports, the president’s speech actually was more about looking forward than looking back.

J.D. Gray

President Barack Obama is shining a spotlight on Elkhart, Indiana – the first city he visited as president – calling it a symbol of America’s economic recovery.

Obama returned Wednesday with a message defends his legacy while laying the groundwork for a Democratic victory this fall.

When the president visited in 2009, unemployment was nearly 20 percent in the community that heavily relies on manufacturing and the recreational vehicle industry,

Seven years later, that rate is now below four percent. 

Kate Hiscock / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slightlyeverything/

The state’s unemployment remained unchanged between December and January, resting at 4.6 percent – that’s nearly a percentage point less than it was a year ago and better than all of Indiana’s neighboring states.  And, over the past six years, from the height of the recession, Indiana’s unemployment rate dropped more than 6 percent.

Flazingo Photos / https://www.flickr.com/photos/124247024@N07/

Indiana’s unemployment rate held steady for the third consecutive month in November, still its lowest level in 14 years. 

The Hoosier State’s private sector added 3,400 jobs last month, helping keep the unemployment rate at 4.4 percent.  It’s been at that level since August, the lowest since the summer of 2001. 

Indiana’s unemployment rate is also lowest among its neighboring states and has been lower than the national average for seven consecutive months. 

The Opus Group

Frankfort is looking to expand its population to fill industrial jobs Mayor Chris McBarnes is trying to lure to the city. The unemployment rate is around 4-percent, which means there are only about 700 unemployed people in the 16,000-person city – and not all of them are trained to be manufacturers.

McBarnes says if ConAgra, which finished its Frankfort distribution hub earlier this month, exercises its option to build a manufacturing center in the city, it’d require hundreds of workers – but McBarnes admits the city would need to import them.

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