Todd Young

Geoff Livingston / flickr.com/photos/geoliv/33262105354

Federal legislation aimed at increasing mental health care access for law enforcement officers is one step closer to passage.

The bipartisan bill – authored by Sens. Joe Donnelly (D-IN) and Todd Young (R-IN) – cleared the U.S. Senate with a unanimous vote.

A small group gathered to protest outside the offices of U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) in after the U.S. House of Representatives sent the Affordable Care Act’s replacement to the U.S. Senate.

The Women’s March Indiana Chapter gathered supporters in downtown Indianapolis to speak out against the plan to repeal and replace Obamacare and support women’s healthcare.

Nancy Hanson has been showing up at Young’s office every week for months. She says she’s worried about the Republican reform bill called the American Health Care Act or AHCA.

Indiana U.S. Senators Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) and Todd Young (R-Ind.) are pushing legislation to help get law enforcement better access to mental health services.

Lebanon, Indiana, police officer Taylor Nielsen says in the wake of a double-homicide she worked last year, she struggled with depression and thoughts of suicide.

Young, Donnelly Want To Avoid Government Shutdown

Apr 24, 2017

U.S. Senator Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) and Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) are headed back to Washington, D.C. as Congress and the White House work to avert a government shutdown.

A federal funding measure approved last year will expire Friday night. Without anything to replace it, a partial shutdown of federal agencies will begin Saturday.

Donnelly says he was part of a small group of senators that helped end the last shutdown.

C-SPAN / https://www.c-span.org/video/?421723-1/hhs-nominee-representative-tom-price-testifies-capitol-hill

During a Senate grilling of Health and Human Services Secretary nominee Tom Price at the Georgia Representative’s confirmation hearing this week, Indiana Senator Todd Young expressed support for a lesser-known part of the Affordable Care Act.

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Youtube video

Indiana residents will now officially be known as “Hoosiers” in all printed federal government documents. 

 

Republican U.S. Rep. Todd Young’s victory in the Indiana Senate race Tuesday night also marked a milestone for his opponent: It was the first race Democrat Evan Bayh has ever lost.

Bayh faced an uphill battle in an election that ended in rebuke for most Democrats in Indiana and nationwide.

Older Hoosiers may have remembered Evan Bayh because his father, Birch Bayh, was a popular senator who authored Title IX and other civil rights laws and helped lower the voting age to 18.

Todd Young will be Indiana’s newest U.S. senator.

The Republican congressman took an easy, 10-point victory over Democrat Evan Bayh Tuesday night in the race to succeed retiring Republican U.S. Sen. Dan Coats.

Young will be the first person to hold this Senate seat since 1989 who isn’t Coats or Bayh. He won with 52 percent of the vote, to Bayh’s 42 percent.

In his victory speech, Young told supporters at the Indiana GOP’s election night party that his win proved the power of democracy.

Nathan Gibbs / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nathangibbs/

The tone of Indiana’s Senate race turned sharply negative essentially since Evan Bayh joined the campaign in July.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith talks to some of the candidates about that tone and explores what impact it will have as the race enters its final stretch.

If you’ve watched TV or listened to the radio in Indiana the last few months, you’ve probably heard an ad like this:  “Bailout Bayh. A sellout, not a senator.”

And this: “Congressman Todd Young will hurt our families.”

Most families in a lead-contaminated public housing complex in East Chicago, Indiana will miss their first deadline to find new homes on Oct. 31.

It means they’ll get extensions through the end of the year, but why has it been so hard to find housing?

On a recent rainy day in East Chicago, landlord Clay Brooks drills open a plywood front door on one of a row of vacant houses and ducks inside.

“So this is one that we’re rehabbing,” he says. “As you can see, some things that need to get done. This is a three-bedroom.”

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