Todd Barton

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton has found himself up against some powerful competition recently.

He appears to have prevailed in a battle against the world’s largest company, Wal-Mart, in a battle over a road near the big box chain’s Crawfordsville location.

But he may also be up against several cell phone companies – and the lawmakers they appear to be bankrolling.

This week on WBAA’s Ask the Mayor, we quiz Mayor Barton about what he’s learned from his recent skirmishes. 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/3051019997
J. Stephen Conn

The newly-reformed Crawfordsville Commission on Human Rights is looking to tackle what the city says is a growing number of issues concerning diversity in the Montgomery County community.

The 12-person commission is intended to serve as an advising body to the mayor and city council on affairs concerning diversity and human rights in the community. The commission was officially created in 1979 but involvement had lapsed in recent years.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/3051019997
J. Stephen Conn

Crawfordsville's mayor plans to create a more localized economic development board after nixing an agreement between the city and a group that had been tasked with promoting it.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Like a lot of college towns, Crawfordsville has a high percentage of rental properties – almost half the town’s residences are landlord-owned.

Also like a lot of college towns, the city sometimes has to crack down on owners of derelict properties which see more than their fair share of police calls.

This week on Ask The Mayor, we talk with Crawfordsville’s Todd Barton about how he’s trying to tackle that problem.

City of Frankfort

Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes is on track to get an $8,000 raise next year.

That constitutes a 15-percent increase – compared to the 3-percent pay raise budgeted for most other city employees, as well as the clerk-treasurer and city judge.

Clerk-Treasurer Judy Sheets says, in accordance with federal law, the parks superintendent is set to receive an 8-percent raise.

The Frankfort City Council on Tuesday approved the salary ordinance on second reading. One more vote is required at next month’s council meeting.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

As WBAA tried to report on the fiscal situation with the Hoosier State Line, we were left to extrapolate whether the train was finally in the black financially.

Turns out we're not alone.

Crawfordsville mayor's office

Like a lot of Indiana cities, Crawfordsville has seen an increase in drug crime in recent years.

The city has taken some steps, such as increasing patrols, but is there more Todd Barton’s administration could do to wield the power of big data in the city’s favor?

We put that question to him today on Ask The Mayor.

Also on this week’s program, the city has some unexpected budget issues to clear up – everything from putting off new power company improvements to figuring out how someone embezzled enough money from the city’s golf course to put it in the red.

Lee Coursey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeco/

As if there aren’t enough orange construction barrels on Indiana roads, drivers should brace for more.

Repairing roads was the priority this year when state lawmakers voted to return local income tax dollars to cities, towns and counties across the state.

How The Cash Can Be Spent

Seventy-five percent of the money must be spent on roads.

Lawmakers allowed local governments to spend the remaining quarter of the money they’re getting back on a non-road project or to put it away for future use.

Courtesy Crawfordsville Mayor's Office

It appears the money is about to start flowing in to fund the improvements Crawfordsville touted to win one of last year’s Stellar Communities designations.

But there are still some kinks to work out, like: don’t you have to own land before you can build on it?

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we get an update on the city’s bank account and its construction progress from Todd Barton.

John Pickerill / Facebook

A week after he announced he was stepping down as head of the Montgomery County Republican Party, John Pickerill now says he’ll run for the Indiana House.

Pickerill says he'll seek the Libertarian nomination to run against House Ways and Means Chairman Tim Brown.

The party's state committee will decide those nominations in two weeks.

Pickerill unseated an incumbent chairman three years ago by a single vote.

Since then, he's been battling rivals within the party who he charges haven't followed a true conservative line.

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