sudden unexpected infant death syndrome

New Program Aims To Reduce Number Of Infant Deaths

Oct 13, 2016
Valentina Powers / https://www.flickr.com/photos/valentinap/253659858

Every woman who gives birth at one of seven Indiana University Health hospitals across the state will receive a sleep sack through a new initiative to decrease infant deaths.  The sacks are like wearable blankets, unlikely to get caught around a baby’s nose and mouth.

The initiative is funded through a partnership with Riley Children’s Health and the Indianapolis Colts, and Riley’s Dr. Kim Schneider says unsafe sleep practice is one of the top three causes of infant death in Indiana, but it is a preventable one.

cheriejoyful / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cheriejphotos/

The infant mortality rates among black babies in Indiana are more than twice the state’s average, according to data from the Indiana State Department of Health.

In 2014, 14.7 babies per every 1000 born to black mothers died before their first birthday. The state’s total infant mortality rate was a little over 7 per every 1000.

Additionally, the rate of Sudden Unexpected Infant Death Syndrome—SUIDS—among black babies is getting exponentially higher. In 2014, 240 African-American babies per every 100,000 died from SUIDS, a 60 percent increase over the year before.