STEM

State Awards STEM Grants For Elementary Schools

Apr 24, 2018

The state is giving money to nearly a dozen school corporations to help them offer more science, technology, engineering and math – or STEM – education.

Lawmakers approved $1 million in 2017 for the State Department of Education to offer the grants. The department’s Chief of Workforce and STEM Alliances, Amanda McCammon, says the goal is to help schools begin, or build up existing STEM education in kindergarten through sixth grade.

“Schools are utilizing them for professional development for teachers, and then they’re also utilizing it for purchasing curriculum,” she says.

(WFIU/WTIU)
Lauren Chapman

How to fix a statewide teacher shortage is still a big question for many schools, but an Indianapolis-based group has announced a new effort to recruit more qualified teachers, in a city with high turnover rates.

Girl Scouts Get First-Hand Engineering Experience

Feb 26, 2018
Jeanie Lindsay / IPB News

The U.S. Department of Commerce estimates around a quarter of STEM jobs are filled by women, but an event in south central Indiana this weekend aimed at giving Girl Scouts a chance to hone their inner-engineer.

An all-day event on Ivy Tech’s Bloomington campus Saturday aimed to get girls excited about STEM through several activities and discussions with professionals in the field of engineering. Cook Medical, Girl Scouts of Central Indiana, the Society of Women Engineers from Southwest Central Indiana, and other local community sponsors worked to put on the event.

Lawmakers Focus On STEM Education For 2018

Nov 27, 2017

Science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, has received a lot of attention at the statehouse lately, and that means the 2018 legislative session could bring major shifts for STEM education throughout the state.

House Education Committee chair Rep. Bob Behning (R-Indianapolis) says he plans to push for more math and science professionals teaching at the elementary school level.

The Indiana Chamber of Commerce emphasized education in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, in its plans for the 2018 legislative session. Chamber Vice President of Education, Workforce Development & Federal Relations, Caryl Auslander, says a major focus is on making computer science a prerequisite for high school graduation.

“While there are STEM requirements for high school graduation, there is not a computer science requirement,” Auslander says. “And we believe that needs to change.”

Global tech firm Infosys will bring 2,000 jobs to Indiana in what Gov. Eric Holcomb calls a “game-changing announcement.”

Infosys plans to open four hubs across the U.S. in the next few years, hiring 10,000 Americans. One of those hubs – and 2,000 of those jobs – will be in Indiana. Infosys CEO Vishal Sikka says the company’s plans are aimed at stressing local hiring as it adjusts to a constantly evolving tech world,

A new report from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education says a rising number of people are getting educational certificates from two-year Indiana colleges, which may help fill the state’s open manufacturing jobs.

The CHE report focuses on credit-bearing certificates – the kind college students can earn in less than one or two years, from programs that “commonly have a career or occupational focus.”

In Indiana, CHE found a 32 percent increase in production of these certificates since 2012, mostly from two-year public schools like Ivy Tech Community College.

Eric Weddle/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Purdue University officials joined Indianapolis school and city leaders Monday to launch a new STEM-focused charter high school set to open next year.

It’s a unique curriculum where graduates who meet Purdue's admission requirements will be a top choice for enrollment.

But as Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Eric Weddle reports, some worry the school could be a drain on the Indianapolis Public Schools District.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

As he completed his final meeting as chair of the University Senate, Purdue professor Kirk Alter chided Provost Deba Dutta and administrators who sit in the Senate for acting on their own behalf, but under the guise of representing the rank-and-file in their departments.

On this Monthly Conversation with Mitch Daniels, we ask Purdue’s president if the line has become too blurred between faculty and staff and whether those administrators are wolves in sheep's clothing.

momboleum / https://www.flickr.com/photos/momboleum/5477189644

A group of private universities is making some graduate level classes free for high school teachers that teach dual credit science, technology, engineering or math. The program, new this spring, is already maxing out in enrollment.

As of last year, Indiana’s thousands of dual credit teachers must have a master’s degree in their content areas to continue to teach high school.

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