SNAP

U.S. Senate Takes Up Farm Bill After House Bill Fails

Jun 12, 2018
Produce from local farmers is unloaded at the Lafayette-based Food Finders. (FILE PHOTO: Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

After the farm bill failed in the U.S. House last month, it’s the Senate’s turn to take the legislation up. Wednesday's Senate hearing is unlikely to be as controversial. 

City of West Lafayette

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re digging into West Lafayette’s growing pains. One of the city's roundabout projects just won an award, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t complaints. And, the city is gearing up for several more development projects both downtown and near the local airport. So how does a city maintain – or shape a new – identity when so much of the past has to be torn down?

The St. Vincent DePaul food pantry in Indianapolis. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Doug Jaggers

The federal farm bill failed in the House on Friday, largely over issues on immigration reform. But another contentious issue divided Indiana representatives. A provision in the bill would have required people on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program — or SNAP — to work or attend job training for 20 hours a week. 

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

On Saturday mornings between May and October, a crowd converges on downtown Lafayette to visit the Lafayette Farmer's Market.

Though it doesn’t take them yet, it’s one of 75 markets in Indiana officially authorized to accept benefits from the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

People are said to experience food insecurity when they do not have access to enough food for all family members to live a healthy, active life. An annual report measures the rate of food insecurity in Indiana slightly under the national average, almost 14 percent of the population. 

The county where the Map the Meal Gap report found the highest rate of food insecurity is Marion County, at 18.3 percent. The county with the lowest measured rate is Hamilton County, at 8.8 percent.  

Caden Crawford / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cadencrawford/

A bill before the Indiana House Committee on Family, Children and Human Affairs would make more people eligible for Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, or SNAP, benefits.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/

A Senate committee on Monday approved a bill that would extend Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits — also known as SNAP or food stamps — to former offenders convicted of certain drug-related offenses.

A federal law prohibits former criminals convicted of, for example, trafficking controlled substances, from receiving food stamp benefits. States can choose to do away with the federal ban with a positive legislative vote.

Lance Cheung / USDA

 Approximately 46 million people nationally receive money from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.  

Of the 871,000 Indiana residents who use SNAP, 7-percent – about 65,000 people -- are at risk of losing their SNAP benefits in October if they do not find a job or enter a work training program.

wader / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wader/

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has chosen Purdue as the site of one of four regional centers for research into nutrition education and obesity prevention.

The North Central Nutrition Education Center of Excellence will focus on research into interpersonal, community and environmental factors that influence the food and physical activity choices of low-income people.

Andrea Church/ morgufile

Oftentimes, the issue of hunger is associated with people in inner cities, where the cost of living tends to be high.

But a new study shows some of the greatest need can be found where America's food supply is grown and raised.

Jon Bailey, director of rural public policy program for the Center for Rural Affairs, authored the report, which examines the use of food stamps, now called SNAP benefits, from 2008 to 2012.